white matter


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Related to white matter: gray matter

white matter

n.
Whitish nerve tissue, especially of the brain and spinal cord, consisting chiefly of myelinated nerve fibers.

white matter

n
(Anatomy) the whitish tissue of the brain and spinal cord, consisting mainly of myelinated nerve fibres. Technical name: substantia alba Compare grey matter

white′ mat`ter



n.
nerve tissue, esp. of the brain and spinal cord, that primarily contains myelinated fibers and is nearly white in color. Compare gray matter (def. 1).
[1830–40]

white matter

The whitish tissue of the brain and spinal cord in vertebrate animals, made up chiefly of nerve fibers covered in myelin sheaths. Compare gray matter.

white matter

Myelin-sheathed nerve fibers.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.white matter - whitish nervous tissue of the CNS consisting of neurons and their myelin sheaths
nerve tissue, nervous tissue - tissue composed of neurons
fibrous astrocyte - star-shaped cells with long processes; found in the white matter of the brain and spinal cord
nerve pathway, nerve tract, pathway, tract - a bundle of myelinated nerve fibers following a path through the brain
central nervous system, CNS, systema nervosum centrale - the portion of the vertebrate nervous system consisting of the brain and spinal cord
Translations

white mat·ter

n. sustancia blanca, tejido nervioso formado en su mayor parte por fibras mielínicas y que constituye el elemento conductor del cerebro y de la médula espinal.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is thought that microstructural brain changes precede brain changes, such as white matter lesions.
Among older women with diabetes for whom the glucose-based energy metabolism promoted by estrogen is already compromised, this downregulation of alternative energy sources may lead to increased atrophy of gray matter, which has a greater metabolic demand relative to white matter," Dr.
Leukoencephalopathy describes the structural changes of cerebral white matter in which myelin suffers the most extensive damage (1).
However, recently, white matter plasticity has also been suggested to exist, based in part on diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging of changes in the brains of people learning to play the piano or juggle.
The study in mice shows that new myelin must be made each time a skill is learned later in life and the structure of the brain's white matter changes during new practical activities by increasing the number of myelin-producing cells.
The white matter is composed of fiberlike parts of brain cells that enable communication between brain regions.
Significant fitnessrelated differences were seen in several key white matter regions, including the corpus callosum which joins the brain's left and right hemispheres.
When people with Down syndrome and dementia were compared to people with Down syndrome without dementia, those same white matter connections were even less healthy.
Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain at the beginning of the study and after two years was used to evaluate periventricular and deep white matter lesions.
Our hypothesis in this study is that HWMs observed in the frontal white matter in early stage AD patients in whom frontal cortical involvement is not expected lead to depressive symptoms relatively independent of medial temporal lobe (MU) atrophy by interrupting fronto-subcortical circuits and this leads to additional impact in patients whose activities of daily living are already affected.
With lacunar infarctions, both upper-limb (UL) and lower-limb paresis are related purely to a white matter lesion [11].