white-eye


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white-eye

(wīt′ī′, hwīt′ī′)
n.
Any of various small greenish birds of the genus Zosterops of Africa, southern Asia, and the Pacific islands, having a narrow ring of white feathers around the eye.

white-eye

n
1. (Animals) Also called (NZ): blighty, silvereye, tauhou or waxeye any songbird of the family Zosteropidae of Africa, Australia, New Zealand, and Asia, having a greenish plumage with a white ring around each eye
2. (Animals) any of certain other birds having a white ring or patch around the eye
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition to this, North Island was also successful in reintroducing the critically endangered Seychelles White-eye Bird as well as Giant Aldabran Tortoises and Black Mud Turtles.
Charles Sousa, Minister of Finance, David Zimmer, Minister of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation, and Chief Leslee White-Eye of Chippewas of the Thames First Nation signed the agreement today in Toronto.
Our position is we would like to see the dam decommissioned," said Chief Leslee White-Eye.
These can then readily be applied to highly-threatened species in the wild, such as in places like Mauritius where we've hit the right note by successfully helping the likes of the Mauritius olive white-eye, Mauritius fody and Mauritius cuckoo shrike.
Researchers found that 15 percent of the snails eaten by Japanese white-eye or mejiro birds survived digestion and were found alive in the birds' droppings.
The six 'missing' birds are the white-breasted white-eye from Norfolk Island, whose disappearance was caused by rat predation; the western Victorian form of the pied currawong and the hooded robin from the Tiwi Islands, both decimated by changes in fire management practices; the thick-billed grasswren from Mice Springs and the southern form of the star finch that once occurred from Townsville to northern NSW, which were both affected by overgrazing; and the spotted quail-thrush from the Mt Lofty Ranges in South Australia, which was driven to probable extinction by habitat fragmentation.