whitecoat


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whitecoat

(ˈwaɪtˌkəʊt)
n
a person, such as a scientist or doctor, who wears a white coat
References in periodicals archive ?
Coming of age in the middle of this volatile situation are sixteen-year-old Octavia and her classmates, greencoats who long to advance to adult whitecoat status, working in the science labs of one of the compounds: Mammalian, Avian, Newt, or Fin.
As animal rights organisations celebrated the collapse of Canada's east-coast whitecoat sealing industry, the Inuit in northern Canada - who do not hunt seal pups, only adult harp seals - suffered from the collapse of the market for seal pelts.
It's reasonable to assume that dogs also suffer from whitecoat syndrome," Dr.
73) Although concerns have been voiced in connection with Operation Whitecoat that Seventh-Day Adventist church officials endorsed the program, with one subject later pointing out that "we grew up to trust the church," (74) the head of USAMRIID emphasizes that participation in research among members of these units is voluntary, with only about eighty percent of the troops consenting to serve as subjects in any one year.
Evan spearheaded successful lobbying, with the presence of physicians on Doctor's Whitecoat Day, the largest rally of physicians at the Capitol in history; coordinated media coverage which highlighted physician/patient issues and led to the reform we enjoy today.
30) "Some whitecoat giving lectures to mothers with crying babies isn't going to make an impact on anyone at all," says Cairncross.
One of the most notorious culls occurred off the Great Blasket Island in Co Kerry in 2004 when more than 50 seals, mainly young whitecoat pups, were found shot or bludgeoned to death.
A European ban on the import of whitecoat seal products (harp seals up to about 12 days old) now has no effect as the sealers wait just a few days for the seals to moult and the products of the hunt can and are imported to EU countries, including our own.
Chantraine saw that a whitecoat shares many of the same characteristics that adults respond to in a child: proportionately large head, large low-lying eyes, and awkward movements.
In one Whitecoat test performed at Dugway, Adventist volunteers sat on a hillside with their shirts off waiting to be bitten by infected mosquitos released by Dugway to determine the effectiveness of using insects as vectors to deliver biological weapons.
The females fled into the water when approached, but their whitecoat pups were not yet capable of independent movement and so were unable to follow (Fig.