Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.


 (wīt′wŏsh′, -wôsh′, hwīt′-)
1. A mixture of lime and water, often with whiting, size, or glue added, that is used to whiten walls, fences, or other structures.
2. Concealment or palliation of flaws or failures.
3. A defeat in a game in which the loser scores no points.
tr.v. white·washed, white·wash·ing, white·wash·es
1. To paint or coat with whitewash.
2. To conceal or gloss over (wrongdoing, for example).
3. Sports To defeat (an opponent) in a game in which the opponent does not score.

white′wash′er n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.whitewashed - coated with whitewashwhitewashed - coated with whitewash; "miles of whitewashed fences"
painted - coated with paint; "freshly painted lawn furniture"
مَطلي بِطلاء جيري مائي
fehérre meszelt
kalkaîur, kalkborinn


(wait) adjective
1. of the colour of the paper on which these words are printed. The bride wore a white dress.
2. having light-coloured skin, through being of European etc descent. the first white man to explore Africa.
3. abnormally pale, because of fear, illness etc. He went white with shock.
4. with milk in it. A white coffee, please.
1. the colour of the paper on which these words are printed. White and black are opposites.
2. a white-skinned person. racial trouble between blacks and whites.
3. (also ˈegg-white) the clear fluid in an egg, surrounding the yolk. This recipe tells you to separate the yolks from the whites.
4. (of an eye) the white part surrounding the pupil and iris. The whites of her eyes are bloodshot.
ˈwhiten verb
to make or become white or whiter. She used a little bleach to whiten the sheets.
ˈwhiteness noun
ˈwhitening noun
a substance used to make certain things (eg tennis shoes) white again.
ˈwhitish adjective
fairly white; close to white.
ˌwhite-ˈcollar adjective
(of workers, jobs etc) not manual; (working) in an office etc.
white elephant
a useless, unwanted possession.
white horse noun
(usually in plural) a wave that has a crest of white foam.
ˌwhite-ˈhot adjective
(of metals) so hot that they have turned white. a white-hot poker.
white lie
a not very serious lie. I'd rather tell my mother a white lie than tell her the truth and upset her.
ˈwhitewash noun
a mixture of usually lime and water, used for whitening walls.
to cover with whitewash.
ˈwhitewashed adjective
white winewine
References in classic literature ?
Then he took me in his arms and called me a blessed little goose, and said he would go down to the cellar, if I wished, and have it whitewashed into the bargain.
It stands on a knoll, surrounded by locust, trees and lofty elms, from among which its decent, whitewashed walls shine modestly forth, like Christian purity beaming through the shades of retirement.
So full of this reeling scene were we, as we stood by the plunging bowsprit, that for some time we did not notice the jeering glances of the passengers, a lubber-like assembly, who marvelled that two fellow beings should be so companionable; as though a white man were anything more dignified than a whitewashed negro.
The room is about thirty feet square, with whitewashed walls, bare save for a calendar.
The rooms were whitewashed once a month; and this one, at least, was the whitest, most simply furnished, and probably neatest apartment in town.
We went upstairs and passed into a large whitewashed apartment which was perhaps fifty feet long by thirty feet wide and twenty or twenty-five high.
The walls of all the rooms was plastered, and most had carpets on the floors, and the whole house was whitewashed on the outside.
In 1830 it was a snug collection of modest one- and two- story frame dwellings, whose whitewashed exteriors were almost concealed from sight by climbing tangles of rose vines, honeysuckles, and morning glories.
Sighing, he dipped his brush and passed it along the topmost plank; repeated the operation; did it again; compared the in- significant whitewashed streak with the far-reaching continent of unwhitewashed fence, and sat down on a tree-box discouraged.
You shall go to a place I have in the south of France: a whitewashed villa on the shores of the Mediterranean.
After they had left the station they had driven through a tiny village and she had seen whitewashed cottages and the lights of a public house.
Tellson's had whitewashed the Cupid, but he was still to be seen on the ceiling, in the coolest linen, aiming (as he very often does) at money from morning to night.