whole tone


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whole tone

or

whole step

n
(Music, other) an interval of two semitones; a frequency difference of 200 cents in the system of equal temperament. Often shortened to: tone
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.whole tone - a musical interval of two semitones
musical interval, interval - the difference in pitch between two notes
References in classic literature ?
Darling could not leave it hanging out at the window, it looked so like the washing and lowered the whole tone of the house.
The whole tone of that letter was wrong, quite wrong.
He set the whole tone of the match after only one minute and four seconds when a clever forward lob sent in Kenedy who managed to get in front of Southampton's rightback Cedric Soares to chest the ball beyond the defender and on to his favoured left foot.
Yet a couple of errors from former Sevilla defender Alberto Moreno - echoing his performance against the same opponents in the Europa League final - turned the whole tone of the contest, as Wissam Ben Yedder struck twice after the break.
But then opening with the rather apt What the World Needs Now is Love, and finishing on That's What Friends are For - not counting a final audience sing-along of Raindrops Keep Falling on My Head - the whole tone of the evening was happily upbeat.
Murray Schafer's Epitaph for Moonlight, I always introduce descending chromatic and whole tone scale patterns several rehearsals in advance.
This is not a detail; it's key to the books' whole tone.
We handpicked everyone, and everybody on set, the whole tone of the set, was what they were doing they were doing out of love.
Book 3 contains "The Great Wave off Kanagawa" by Japanese artist, Katsushika Hokusai, utilizing whole tone scales and a broken left hand chord pattern to represent the waves.
Port Talbot is always a tough place to go, we've not done well there, but the whole tone of the game was set by their penalty decision.