wholly


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Related to wholly: Wholly owned subsidiary

whol·ly

 (hō′lē, hōl′lē)
adv.
1. Completely; entirely: "The old American purposes are still wholly relevant" (John F. Kennedy).
2. Exclusively; solely.

wholly

(ˈhəʊllɪ)
adv
1. completely, totally, or entirely
2. without exception; exclusively

whol•ly

(ˈhoʊ li, ˈhoʊl li)

adv.
1. entirely; totally.
2. to the whole amount, extent, etc.
[1250–1300]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.wholly - to a complete degree or to the full or entire extent (`whole' is often used informally for `wholly')wholly - to a complete degree or to the full or entire extent (`whole' is often used informally for `wholly'); "he was wholly convinced"; "entirely satisfied with the meal"; "it was completely different from what we expected"; "was completely at fault"; "a totally new situation"; "the directions were all wrong"; "it was not altogether her fault"; "an altogether new approach"; "a whole new idea"
colloquialism - a colloquial expression; characteristic of spoken or written communication that seeks to imitate informal speech
part, partially, partly - in part; in some degree; not wholly; "I felt partly to blame"; "He was partially paralyzed"

wholly

adverb
2. solely, only, exclusively, without exception, to the exclusion of everything else societies which rely wholly on farming to survive

wholly

adverb
Translations
كُلِيّا
helt
बिलकुलबिल्कुल
algerlega

wholly

[ˈhəʊlɪ] ADVtotalmente, completamente
not wholly successfulno todo un éxito, no un éxito completo

wholly

[ˈhəʊlli] adv [new, false] → entièrement
The accusation is wholly without foundation
BUT Cette accusation est sans aucun fondement.wholly-owned subsidiary [ˈhəʊlliəʊnd] nfiliale f à 100%, filiale f en propriété exclusive

wholly

advvöllig, gänzlich; the project was wholly successfuldas Projekt war gänzlich erfolgreich or war ein voller Erfolg; I’m not wholly convinced that …ich bin nicht völlig or gänzlich überzeugt, dass …; this is wholly but whollydas ist völlig und ganz

wholly

[ˈhəʊlɪ] advcompletamente, del tutto

whole

(həul) adjective
1. including everything and/or everyone; complete. The whole staff collected the money for your present; a whole pineapple.
2. not broken; in one piece. She swallowed the biscuit whole.
noun
1. a single unit. The different parts were joined to form a whole.
2. the entire thing. We spent the whole of one week sunbathing on the beach.
ˈwholeness noun
ˈwholly adverb
completely or altogether. I am not wholly certain yet.
ˌwholeˈhearted adjective
sincere and enthusiastic. wholehearted support.
ˈwholemeal noun
flour made from the entire wheat grain or seed. wholemeal flour/bread.
on the whole
taking everything into consideration. Our trip was successful on the whole.
References in classic literature ?
If this expressive article of dress was drawn low upon the forehead, it was a sign that hard work was going on, in exciting moments it was pushed rakishly askew, and when despair seized the author it was plucked wholly off, and cast upon the floor, and cast upon the floor.
He walked between them, whether with malicious or mischievous intent was not wholly clear, even to himself.
And you, Duncan, guide me; control me between you; for I am wholly yours
Still, there will be a connection with the long past--a reference to forgotten events and personages, and to manners, feelings, and opinions, almost or wholly obsolete --which, if adequately translated to the reader, would serve to illustrate how much of old material goes to make up the freshest novelty of human life.
not wholly devoid of an idea that he might behold an evil spirit.
They flanked opposite ends of the house and were probably architectural absurdities, redeemed in a measure indeed by not being wholly disengaged nor of a height too pretentious, dating, in their gingerbread antiquity, from a romantic revival that was already a respectable past.
Whilst I was thus closely scanning him, half-pretending meanwhile to be looking out at the storm from the casement, he never heeded my presence, never troubled himself with so much as a single glance; but appeared wholly occupied with counting the pages of the marvellous book.
So close did the monster come to the hull, that at first it seemed as if he meant it malice; but suddenly going down in a maelstrom, within three rods of the planks, he wholly disappeared from view, as if diving under the keel.
Though parted from all his soul held dear, and though often yearning for what lay beyond, still was he never positively and consciously miserable; for, so well is the harp of human feeling strung, that nothing but a crash that breaks every string can wholly mar its harmony; and, on looking back to seasons which in review appear to us as those of deprivation and trial, we can remember that each hour, as it glided, brought its diversions and alleviations, so that, though not happy wholly, we were not, either, wholly miserable.
Accordingly, the next time I had the honour to see our emperor, I desired his general license to wait on the Blefuscudian monarch, which he was pleased to grant me, as I could perceive, in a very cold manner; but could not guess the reason, till I had a whisper from a certain person, "that Flimnap and Bolgolam had represented my intercourse with those ambassadors as a mark of disaffection;" from which I am sure my heart was wholly free.
I had long before remarked that, in relation to practice, it is sometimes necessary to adopt, as if above doubt, opinions which we discern to be highly uncertain, as has been already said; but as I then desired to give my attention solely to the search after truth, I thought that a procedure exactly the opposite was called for, and that I ought to reject as absolutely false all opinions in regard to which I could suppose the least ground for doubt, in order to ascertain whether after that there remained aught in my belief that was wholly indubitable.
However proper such reasonings might be to show that a thing OUGHT NOT TO EXIST, they are wholly to be rejected when they are made use of to prove that it does not exist contrary to the evidence of the fact itself.