wick


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wick

 (wĭk)
n.
1. A cord or strand of loosely woven, twisted, or braided fibers, as on a candle or oil lamp, that draws up fuel to the flame by capillary action.
2. A piece of material that conveys liquid by capillary action.
tr. & intr.v. wicked (wĭkt), wick·ing, wicks
To convey or be conveyed by capillary action: water gradually wicking up through the bricks.

[Middle English wike, from Old English wēoce.]

wick

(wɪk)
n
1. (Textiles) a cord or band of loosely twisted or woven fibres, as in a candle, cigarette lighter, etc, that supplies fuel to a flame by capillary action
2. get on someone's wick slang Brit to cause irritation to a person
[Old English weoce; related to Old High German wioh, Middle Dutch wēke (Dutch wiek)]
ˈwicking n

wick

(wɪk)
n
(Human Geography) archaic a village or hamlet
[Old English wīc; related to -wich in place names, Latin vīcus, Greek oîkos]

wick

(wɪk)
adj
1. lively or active
2. alive or crawling: a dog wick with fleas.
[dialect variant of quick alive]

Wick

(wɪk)
n
(Placename) a town in N Scotland, in Highland, at the head of Wick Bay (an inlet of the North Sea). Pop: 7333 (2001)

wick1

(wɪk)

n.
1. a twist or braid of soft threads or a woven strip, as of cotton, that in a candle, lamp, etc., serves to draw up the flammable liquid to be burned.
v.t.
2. to draw off (liquid) by capillary action.
[before 1000; Middle English wicke, weke, Old English wice, wēoc(e), c. Middle Dutch wiecke, Old High German wiohha lint, wick]
wick′less, adj.

wick3


(wik),
n.
Archaic. a village; hamlet.
[before 900; Middle English wik, wich, Old English wīc house, village (compare Old Saxon wīc, Old High German wîch) < Latin vīcus village, estate (see vicinity); c. Greek oîkos house (see ecology, economy)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wick - any piece of cord that conveys liquid by capillary actionwick - any piece of cord that conveys liquid by capillary action; "the physician put a wick in the wound to drain it"
cord - a line made of twisted fibers or threads; "the bundle was tied with a cord"
2.wick - a loosely woven cord (in a candle or oil lamp) that draws fuel by capillary action up into the flamewick - a loosely woven cord (in a candle or oil lamp) that draws fuel by capillary action up into the flame
candle, wax light, taper - stick of wax with a wick in the middle
candlewick - the wick of a candle
cord - a line made of twisted fibers or threads; "the bundle was tied with a cord"
kerosene lamp, kerosine lamp, oil lamp - a lamp that burns oil (as kerosine) for light
Translations
فَتيلَه، ذُبالَه
knot
væge
sydänsydänlanka
kanóc
kveikur
dagtis
dakts
knot
fitil
knôt

wick

[wɪk] Nmecha f
he gets on my wickme hace subir por las paredes
to dip one's wickechar un polvo

wick

[ˈwɪk] n
[candle] → mèche f
to get on sb's wick (British, British)taper à qn sur les nerfs

wick

nDocht m; to get on somebody’s wick (Brit inf) → jdm auf den Wecker gehen (inf)or fallen (inf)

wick

[wɪk] nstoppino, lucignolo

wick

(wik) noun
the twisted threads of cotton etc in a candle, lamp etc, which draw up the oil or wax into the flame.

wick

n mecha
References in classic literature ?
His creditor was Wick Cutter, the merciless Black Hawk money-lender, a man of evil name throughout the county, of whom I shall have more to say later.
I well know that these Crappoes of Frenchmen are but poor devils in the fishery; sometimes lowering their boats for breakers, mistaking them for Sperm Whale spouts; yes, and sometimes sailing from their port with their hold full of boxes of tallow candles, and cases of snuffers, foreseeing that all the oil they will get won't be enough to dip the Captain's wick into; aye, we all know these things; but look ye, here's a Crappo that is content with our leavings, the drugged whale there, I mean; aye, and is content too with scraping the dry bones of that other precious fish he has there.
He shied his helmet into the corner, and in half a minute he had a new wick in the alcohol lamp and was firing up on the croup-kettle.
The children fastened their eyes upon their bit of candle and watched it melt slowly and pitilessly away; saw the half inch of wick stand alone at last; saw the feeble flame rise and fall, climb the thin column of smoke, linger at its top a moment, and then -- the horror of utter darkness reigned!
Seesaw has gone to the doctor's to try if he can borrow a wick, and mother let me have a pint of oil, but she says she won't give me any more.
Here the socket of the candle dropped, and the wick went out.
It's as wick as you or me," he said; and Mary remembered that Martha had told her that "wick" meant "alive" or "lively.
She left it, and paused to trim the wick of the candle before she tried the buhl cabinet next.
A crazy old staircase I found it to be, feebly lighted on each landing by a club- headed little oil wick, dying away in a little dungeon of dirty glass.
While I was considering that some one must have been there lately and must soon be coming back, or the candle would not be burning, it came into my head to look if the wick were long.
And it is well that nature has so graciously and abundantly lighted the Martian night, for the green men of Mars, being a nomadic race without high intellectual development, have but crude means for artificial lighting; depending principally upon torches, a kind of candle, and a peculiar oil lamp which generates a gas and burns without a wick.
When at last the flickering blue flame had been transferred to the wick and began to expand and clarify, and shed a wide circle of misty brightness round the gig, it became possible for the two young men to see each other and the thing they had along with them.