wicker

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Related to wickers: Wickes

wick·er

 (wĭk′ər)
n.
1. Flexible twigs, branches, plant stems, or pieces of synthetic material, used for making baskets or furniture.
2. Wickerwork.

[Middle English wiker, of Scandinavian origin; see weik- in Indo-European roots.]

wicker

(ˈwɪkə)
n
1. (Forestry) a slender flexible twig or shoot, esp of willow
2. (Forestry) short for wickerwork
adj
(Forestry) made, consisting of, or constructed from wicker
[C14: from Scandinavian; compare Swedish viker, Danish viger willow, Swedish vika to bend]

wick•er

(ˈwɪk ər)

n.
1. a slender, pliant twig; osier.
2. plaited or woven twigs or osiers as the material of baskets, chairs, etc.; wickerwork.
3. something made of wickerwork, as a basket.
adj.
4. consisting or made of wicker: a wicker chair.
5. covered with wicker: a wicker jug.
[1300–50; Middle English < Scandinavian; compare dial. Swedish vikker willow; akin to weak]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wicker - slender flexible branches or twigs (especially of willow or some canes)wicker - slender flexible branches or twigs (especially of willow or some canes); used for wickerwork
wood - the hard fibrous lignified substance under the bark of trees
2.wicker - work made of interlaced slender branches (especially willow branches)wicker - work made of interlaced slender branches (especially willow branches)
piece of work, work - a product produced or accomplished through the effort or activity or agency of a person or thing; "it is not regarded as one of his more memorable works"; "the symphony was hailed as an ingenious work"; "he was indebted to the pioneering work of John Dewey"; "the work of an active imagination"; "erosion is the work of wind or water over time"
Translations
غُصْن رَفيع من الخَيْزَران
kurve-
vitsa
vesszõbõl font
tága-
iš vytelių
pīts
sepet işi/örgüsü

wicker

[ˈwɪkəʳ]
A. Nmimbre m or f
B. CPDde mimbre

wicker

[ˈwɪkər] n
(= stick, stem) → osier m
(also wickerwork) → vannerie f

wicker

nKorbgeflecht nt
adj attrKorb-; wicker furnitureKorbmöbel pl

wicker

:
wicker (arm)chair
nKorbsessel m
wicker basket
n(Weiden)korb m
wicker fence
nWeidenzaun m
wickerwork
n (= activity)Korbflechten nt; (= material)Korbgeflecht nt; (= articles)Korbwaren pl
adjKorb-; wicker chairKorbsessel m; wicker basketWeidenkorb m

wicker

[ˈwɪkəʳ]
1. nvimini mpl
2. adjdi vimini

wicker

(ˈwikə) adjective
(of eg a chair or basket) made of twigs, rushes etc woven together.
ˈwickerwork noun
articles made in this way.
References in classic literature ?
Jasper's wicker bottle, which circulates freely;--in the sense, that is to say, that its contents enter freely into Mr.
But notwithstanding these precedents to the contrary, Gabriel Grub was an ill-conditioned, cross-grained, surly fellow--a morose and lonely man, who consorted with nobody but himself, and an old wicker bottle which fitted into his large deep waistcoat pocket--and who eyed each merry face, as it passed him by, with such a deep scowl of malice and ill-humour, as it was difficult to meet without feeling something the worse for.
The poor folks used to buy the wicker mats on which they drain their cheeses, and all the baskets needed for the insignificant trade of the district.
Then he sat down on the wicker edge opposite to Bert, and put one leg over to dangle outside.
Seating himself in a wicker rocker which was there, he once more applied himself to the task of reading the newspaper.
For example, by all their common and familiar performances--throwing large objects into the air which never come down; causing plants to sprout, grow visibly and blossom, in bare ground chosen by spectators; putting a man into a wicker basket, piercing him through and through with a sword while he shrieks and bleeds, and then--the basket being opened nothing is there; tossing the free end of a silken ladder into the air, mounting it and disappearing.
At once a little girl rose from her seat and walked to the door of the car, carrying a wicker suit-case in one hand and a round bird-cage covered up with newspapers in the other, while a parasol was tucked under her arm.
From this framework was suspended a wicker basket or car.
Lord Henry was lying back in a silk-draped wicker chair, looking at them.
The biggest piece of furniture was an enormous wicker trunk, with a very lively coloured stocking dangling out at a hole in it, and a notice on the top that Joey was the funniest man on earth.
They passed out of the compound through a small wicker gate, and went on under the blazing sun, winding about among new-planted cocoanuts that threw no shade.
I was sufficiently conversant with Holmes's methods to be able to follow his reasoning, and to see that the nature and state of the various medical instruments in the wicker basket which hung in the lamplight inside the brougham had given him the data for his swift deduction.