wigwam


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wig·wam

 (wĭg′wŏm′)
n.
A Native American dwelling commonly having an arched or conical framework overlaid with bark, hides, or mats.

[Eastern Abenaki wìkəwαm, from Proto-Algonquian *wi·kiwa·ʔmi.]

wigwam

(ˈwɪɡˌwæm)
n
1. (Anthropology & Ethnology) any dwelling of the North American Indians, esp one made of bark, rushes, or skins spread over or enclosed by a set of arched poles lashed together. Compare tepee
2. (Games, other than specified) a similar structure for children
[from Abnaki and Massachuset wīkwām, literally: their abode]

wig•wam

(ˈwɪg wɒm, -wɔm)

n.
an American Indian dwelling, typically of rounded or oval shape, formed of poles overlaid with bark, mats, or skins.
[1620–30, Amer.; < Eastern Abenaki wìkəwαm house < Proto-Algonquian *wi·kiwa·ˀmi; compare wickiup]

wigwam

An Abnaki word meaning abode, used to mean a Native American tent-like dwelling.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wigwam - a Native American lodge frequently having an oval shape and covered with bark or hideswigwam - a Native American lodge frequently having an oval shape and covered with bark or hides
indian lodge, lodge - any of various Native American dwellings
Translations
خَيْمَةٌ عند الهُنود الحُمُر
wigwam
indián sátor
indíánatjald
vigvamas
vigvams
vigvam
kızılderili çadırı

wigwam

[ˈwɪgwæm] Ntipi m, tienda f india

wigwam

[ˈwɪgwæm] nwigwam m

wigwam

nWigwam m

wigwam

[ˈwɪgˌwæm] nwigwam m inv

wigwam

(ˈwigwam) , ((American) -wa:m) noun
a North American Indian tent made of skins etc.
References in classic literature ?
Tierra del Fuego, first arrival -- Good Success Bay -- An Account of the Fuegians on board -- Interview With the Savages -- Scenery of the Forests -- Cape Horn -- Wigwam Cove -- Miserable Condition of the Savages -- Famines -- Cannibals -- Matricide -- Religious Feelings -- Great Gale -- Beagle Channel -- Ponsonby Sound -- Build Wigwams and settle the Fuegians -- Bifurcation of the Beagle Channel -- Glaciers -- Return to the Ship -- Second Visit in the Ship to the Settlement -- Equality of Condition amongst the Natives.
Great black clouds were rolling across the heavens, and squalls of rain, with hail, swept by us with such extreme violence, that the Captain determined to run into Wigwam Cove.
In the Indian gazettes a wigwam was the symbol of a day's march, and a row of them cut or painted on the bark of a tree signified that so many times they had camped.
So he left them, and took his wife and three children, and they journeyed on until they found a spot near to a clear stream, where they began to cut down trees, and to make ready their wigwam.
Yea, said Captain Bildad in his hollow voice, sticking his head from behind Peleg's, out of the wigwam.
When it was beginning to come on dark we poked our heads out of the cottonwood thicket, and looked up and down and across; nothing in sight; so Jim took up some of the top planks of the raft and built a snug wigwam to get under in blazing weather and rainy, and to keep the things dry.
As the slaughter of so many buffaloes had provided the party with beef for the winter, in case they met with no further supply, they now set to work, heart and hand, to build a comfortable wigwam.
Upon my word were I at Mackinaw, I should take this to be the inside of an Indian wigwam.
A Christmas dinner in the wigwam of an Indian chief
He will make the fire-water from the islands in the salt lake flow before the wigwam of Magua, until the heart of the Indian shall be lighter than the feathers of the humming- bird, and his breath sweeter than the wild honeysuckle.
In many places the English found the wigwams deserted and the cornfields growing to waste, with none to harvest the grain.
Stand here, daughter, where you can see the great spring, the wigwams of your father, and the land on the crooked river.