wild flower


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wild·flow·er

also wild flow·er  (wīld′flou′ər)
n.
1. A usually herbaceous flowering plant that is not a cultivated variety, especially one that has conspicuous flowers and is found in a natural environment.
2. The flower of such a plant.

wild flower

n
1. (Botany) Also: wildflower any flowering plant that grows in an uncultivated state
2. (Botany) the flower of such a plant
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wild flower - wild or uncultivated flowering plantwild flower - wild or uncultivated flowering plant
wilding - a wild uncultivated plant (especially a wild apple or crabapple tree)
angiosperm, flowering plant - plants having seeds in a closed ovary
Ranunculus glaberrimus, sagebrush buttercup - small early-flowering buttercup with shiny yellow flowers of western North America
pasque flower, pasqueflower - any plant of the genus Pulsatilla; sometimes included in genus Anemone
meadow rue - any of various herbs of the genus Thalictrum; sometimes rhizomatous or tuberous perennials found in damp shady places and meadows or stream banks; have lacy foliage and clouds of small purple or yellow flowers
sand verbena - any of various plants of the genus Abronia of western North America and Mexico having flowers resembling verbena
Allionia incarnata, trailing four o'clock, trailing windmills - trailing plant having crowded clusters of 3 brilliant deep pink flowers resembling a single flower blooming near the ground; found in dry gravelly or sandy soil; southwestern United States and Mexico
Calandrinia ciliata, red maids, redmaids - succulent carpet-forming plant having small brilliant reddish-pink flowers; southwestern United States
Lewisia cotyledon, siskiyou lewisia - evergreen perennial having a dense basal rosette of long spatula-shaped leaves and panicles of pink or white-and-red-striped or pink-purple flowers; found on cliffs and in rock crevices in mountains of southwestern Oregon and northern California
bitterroot, Lewisia rediviva - showy succulent ground-hugging plant of Rocky Mountains regions having deep to pale pink flowers and fleshy farinaceous roots; the Montana state flower
Calyptridium umbellatum, pussy-paw, pussy-paws, pussy's-paw, Spraguea umbellatum - pink clusters of densely packed flowers on prostrate stems resemble upturned pads of cats' feet; grow in coniferous forests of western North America
Talinum aurantiacum, flame flower, flameflower, flame-flower - plant with fleshy roots and erect stems with narrow succulent leaves and one reddish-orange flower in each upper leaf axil; southwestern United States; Indians once cooked the fleshy roots
Antheropeas wallacei, dwarf daisy, Eriophyllum wallacei, woolly daisy - tiny grey woolly tufted annual with small golden-yellow flower heads; southeastern California to northwestern Arizona and southwestern Utah; sometimes placed in genus Eriophyllum
Arnica cordifolia, heartleaf arnica - wildflower with heart-shaped leaves and broad yellow flower heads; of alpine areas west of the Rockies from Alaska to southern California
Arnica montana - herb of pasture and open woodland throughout most of Europe and western Asia having orange-yellow daisylike flower heads that when dried are used as a stimulant and to treat bruises and swellings
false chamomile - any of various autumn-flowering perennials having white or pink to purple flowers that resemble asters; wild in moist soils from New Jersey to Florida and Texas
oxeye - Eurasian perennial herbs having daisylike flowers with yellow rays and dark centers
golden aster - any of several shrubby herbs or subshrubs of the genus Chrysopsis having bright golden-yellow flower heads that resemble asters; throughout much of United States and into Canada
hawk's-beard, hawk's-beards - any of various plants of the genus Crepis having loose heads of yellow flowers on top of a long branched leafy stem; northern hemisphere
brittle bush, brittlebush, Encelia farinosa, incienso - fragrant rounded shrub of southwestern United States and adjacent Mexico having brittle stems and small crowded blue-green leaves and yellow flowers; produces a resin used in incense and varnish and in folk medicine
Enceliopsis nudicaulis, sunray - herb having a basal cluster of grey-green leaves and leafless stalks each with a solitary broad yellow flower head; desert areas Idaho to Arizona
engelmannia - common erect hairy perennial of plains and prairies of southern and central United States having flowers that resemble sunflowers
fleabane - any of several North American plants of the genus Erigeron having daisylike flowers; formerly believed to repel fleas
woolly sunflower - any plant of the genus Eriophyllum
gaillardia - any plant of western America of the genus Gaillardia having hairy leaves and long-stalked flowers in hot vibrant colors from golden yellow and copper to rich burgundy
desert sunflower, Gerea canescens - slender hairy plant with few leaves and golden-yellow flower heads; sandy desert areas of southeastern California to southwestern Utah and western Arizona and northwestern Mexico
goldenbush - a plant of the genus Haplopappus
heliopsis, oxeye - any North American shrubby perennial herb of the genus Heliopsis having large yellow daisylike flowers
Chrysopsis villosa, hairy golden aster, Heterotheca villosa, prairie golden aster - hairy perennial with yellow flower heads in branched clusters; found almost everywhere in dry places from Canada to west central and western United States; sometimes placed in genus Chrysopsis
References in classic literature ?
We had such a beautiful day, and such endless pictures of limpid lakes, and green hills and valleys, and majestic mountains, and milky cataracts dancing down the steeps and gleaming in the sun, that we could not help feeling sweet toward all the world; so we tried to drink all the milk, and eat all the grapes and apricots and berries, and buy all the bouquets of wild flowers which the little peasant boys and girls offered for sale; but we had to retire from this contract, for it was too heavy.
As I listened to the companionable murmur of the stream, I almost expected to see her again, in her simple white frock and straw hat, singing to the music of the rivulet, and freshening her nosegay of wild flowers by dipping it in the cool water.
Huldah Meserve asked permission to cover the largest holes in the plastered walls with boughs and fill the water pail with wild flowers.
hie thee away To springs that lie clearest Beneath the moon-ray - To lone lake that smiles, In its dream of deep rest, At the many star-isles That enjewel its breast - Where wild flowers, creeping, Have mingled their shade, On its margin is sleeping Full many a maid - Some have left the cool glade, and
The pageant of the wild flowers vanished until all that lingered on the burnt hillsides were orange poppies faded to palest gold, and Mariposa lilies, wind-blown on slender stems amidst the desiccated grasses, that smouldered like ornate spotted moths fluttering in rest for a space between flight and flight.
Rather let it be named from the fishes that swim in it, the wild fowl or quadrupeds which frequent it, the wild flowers which grow by its shores, or some wild man or child the thread of whose history is interwoven with its own; not from him who could show no title to it but the deed which a like-minded neighbor or legislature gave him -- him who thought only of its money value; whose presence perchance cursed all the shores; who exhausted the land around it, and would fain have exhausted the waters within it; who regretted only that it was not English hay or cranberry meadow -- there was nothing to redeem it, forsooth, in his eyes -- and would have drained and sold it for the mud at its bottom.
In the morning, Oliver would be a-foot by six o'clock, roaming the fields, and plundering the hedges, far and wide, for nosegays of wild flowers, with which he would return laden, home; and which it took great care and consideration to arrange, to the best advantage, for the embellishment of the breakfast-table.
I live, you see, in the London stink; and the smell of the hedges and the wild flowers is too much for me at first.
There were the hedgerows where the brother and sister had so often gathered wild flowers together, and the green fields and shady paths where they had so often strayed.
Ezra Jennings stopped for a moment, and picked some wild flowers from the hedge by the roadside.
Splendid trees reared their stately tops where splendid cathedrals once had reared their domes, and sweet wild flowers blossomed in simple serenity in soil that once was drenched with human blood.
The freshness of the day, the singing of the birds, the beauty of the waving grass, the deep green leaves, the wild flowers, and the thousand exquisite scents and sounds that floated in the air-- deep joys to most of us, but most of all to those whose life is in a crowd or who live solitarily in great cities as in the bucket of a human well--sunk into their breasts and made them very glad.