wildcat


Also found in: Thesaurus, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

wild·cat

 (wīld′kăt′)
n.
1. Any of various wild felines of small to medium size, including the bobcat and the caracal.
2. A small wild feline (Felis silvestris) of Eurasia and Africa, generally regarded as being the ancestor of the domestic cat.
3.
a. A quick-tempered person.
b. A person regarded as fierce.
4. An oil or natural-gas well drilled in an area not known to be productive.
5. A workers' strike unauthorized by their union.
adj.
1.
a. Risky or unsound, especially financially.
b. Issued by a financially irresponsible bank: wildcat currency.
c. Operating or accomplished outside the norms of standard, ethical business procedures: wildcat life insurance schemes.
2. Of, relating to, or being an oil or natural-gas well drilled speculatively in an area not known to be productive.
3. Undertaken by workers without approval of the officials of their union: a wildcat strike.
v. wild·cat·ted, wild·cat·ting, wild·cats
v.tr.
To prospect for (oil, for example) in an area supposed to be unproductive.
v.intr.
1. To prospect for oil or other minerals in an area not known to be productive.
2. To go out on an unauthorized labor strike.

wildcat

(ˈwaɪldˌkæt)
n, pl -cats or -cat
1. (Animals) a wild European cat, Felis silvestris, that resembles the domestic tabby but is larger and has a bushy tail
2. (Animals) any of various other felines, esp of the genus Lynx, such as the lynx and the caracal
3. (Animals) US and Canadian another name for bobcat
4. informal a savage or aggressive person
5. (Mining & Quarrying) an exploratory drilling for petroleum or natural gas
6. (Commerce) US and Canadian an unsound commercial enterprise
7. (Railways) US and Canadian a railway locomotive in motion without drawing any carriages or wagons. Also called (in Britain and certain other countries): light engine
8. (Commerce) (modifier)
a. of or relating to an unsound business enterprise: wildcat stock.
b. financially or commercially unsound: a wildcat project.
9. (Railways) (modifier) US and Canadian (of a train) running without permission or outside the timetable
vb, -cats, -catting or -catted
(Mining & Quarrying) (intr) to drill for petroleum or natural gas in an area having no known reserves
ˈwildˌcatting n, adj

wild•cat

(ˈwaɪldˌkæt)

n., pl. -cats, (esp. collectively) -cat for 1-4, n.
1.
a. a small striped Eurasian cat, Felis sylvestris, related to the domestic cat.
b. any of several small- to medium-sized wild cats, as the bobcat or ocelot.
c. a domestic cat that has become feral.
2. a quick-tempered or savage person.
3. a single locomotive operating without a train, as one switching cars.
4. an exploratory well drilled in an effort to discover deposits of oil or gas; a prospect well.
5. a reckless or unsound enterprise, business, etc.
adj.
8. characterized by or proceeding from unsafe business methods: wildcat stocks.
9. of or pertaining to an illicit enterprise or product.
10. running without control or regulation, as a locomotive, or apart from the regular schedule, as a train.
v.i.
11. to search an area for oil, gas, ore, etc., esp. as an independent prospector.
v.t.
12. to search (an area of unknown or doubtful productivity) for oil, ore, or the like.
[1375–1425]

wildcat


Past participle: wildcatted
Gerund: wildcatting

Imperative
wildcat
wildcat
Present
I wildcat
you wildcat
he/she/it wildcats
we wildcat
you wildcat
they wildcat
Preterite
I wildcatted
you wildcatted
he/she/it wildcatted
we wildcatted
you wildcatted
they wildcatted
Present Continuous
I am wildcatting
you are wildcatting
he/she/it is wildcatting
we are wildcatting
you are wildcatting
they are wildcatting
Present Perfect
I have wildcatted
you have wildcatted
he/she/it has wildcatted
we have wildcatted
you have wildcatted
they have wildcatted
Past Continuous
I was wildcatting
you were wildcatting
he/she/it was wildcatting
we were wildcatting
you were wildcatting
they were wildcatting
Past Perfect
I had wildcatted
you had wildcatted
he/she/it had wildcatted
we had wildcatted
you had wildcatted
they had wildcatted
Future
I will wildcat
you will wildcat
he/she/it will wildcat
we will wildcat
you will wildcat
they will wildcat
Future Perfect
I will have wildcatted
you will have wildcatted
he/she/it will have wildcatted
we will have wildcatted
you will have wildcatted
they will have wildcatted
Future Continuous
I will be wildcatting
you will be wildcatting
he/she/it will be wildcatting
we will be wildcatting
you will be wildcatting
they will be wildcatting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been wildcatting
you have been wildcatting
he/she/it has been wildcatting
we have been wildcatting
you have been wildcatting
they have been wildcatting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been wildcatting
you will have been wildcatting
he/she/it will have been wildcatting
we will have been wildcatting
you will have been wildcatting
they will have been wildcatting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been wildcatting
you had been wildcatting
he/she/it had been wildcatting
we had been wildcatting
you had been wildcatting
they had been wildcatting
Conditional
I would wildcat
you would wildcat
he/she/it would wildcat
we would wildcat
you would wildcat
they would wildcat
Past Conditional
I would have wildcatted
you would have wildcatted
he/she/it would have wildcatted
we would have wildcatted
you would have wildcatted
they would have wildcatted
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wildcat - an exploratory oil well drilled in land not known to be an oil field
oil well, oiler - a well that yields or has yielded oil
2.wildcat - a cruelly rapacious personwildcat - a cruelly rapacious person    
aggressor, assailant, assaulter, attacker - someone who attacks
3.wildcat - any small or medium-sized cat resembling the domestic cat and living in the wild
Felis, genus Felis - type genus of the Felidae: true cats and most wildcats
cat, true cat - feline mammal usually having thick soft fur and no ability to roar: domestic cats; wildcats
sand cat - a desert wildcat
catamountain, European wildcat, Felis silvestris - bushy-tailed wildcat of Europe that resembles the domestic cat and is regarded as the ancestor of the domestic cat
cougar, Felis concolor, mountain lion, puma, catamount, panther, painter - large American feline resembling a lion
Felis pardalis, ocelot, panther cat - nocturnal wildcat of Central America and South America having a dark-spotted buff-brown coat
eyra, Felis yagouaroundi, jaguarondi, jaguarundi, jaguarundi cat - long-bodied long-tailed tropical American wildcat
caffer cat, Felis ocreata, kaffir cat - widely distributed wildcat of Africa and Asia Minor
Felis chaus, jungle cat - small Asiatic wildcat
Felis serval, serval - slender long-legged African wildcat having large untufted ears and tawny black-spotted coat
Felis bengalensis, leopard cat - small spotted wildcat of southern Asia and Malaysia
Felis tigrina, tiger cat - medium-sized wildcat of Central America and South America having a dark-striped coat
Felis wiedi, margay, margay cat - small spotted wildcat found from Texas to Brazil
Felis manul, manul, Pallas's cat - small wildcat of the mountains of Siberia and Tibet and Mongolia
catamount, lynx - short-tailed wildcats with usually tufted ears; valued for their fur
Adj.1.wildcat - outside the bounds of legitimate or ethical business practices; "wildcat currency issued by irresponsible banks"; "wildcat stock speculation"; "a wildcat airline"; "wildcat life insurance schemes"
unsound - not sound financially; "unsound banking practices"
2.wildcat - without official authorizationwildcat - without official authorization; "an unauthorized strike"; "wildcat work stoppage"
unofficial - not having official authority or sanction; "a sort of unofficial mayor"; "an unofficial estimate"; "he participated in an unofficial capacity"
3.wildcat - (of a mine or oil well) drilled speculatively in an area not known to be productive; "drilling there would be strictly a wildcat operation"; "a wildcat mine"; "wildcat drilling"; "wildcat wells"
explorative, exploratory - serving in or intended for exploration or discovery; "an exploratory operation"; "exploratory reconnaissance"; "digging an exploratory well in the Gulf of Mexico"; "exploratory talks between diplomats"
Translations
fauveforage d'exploration

wildcat

[ˈwaɪldˈkæt]
A. N (wildcats or wildcat (pl))
1. (Zool) → gato m montés
2. (for oil) → perforación f de sondaje en tierra virgen
B. VI (US) → hacer perforaciones para extraer petróleo
C. CPD [scheme, venture] → descabellado
wildcat strike Nhuelga f salvaje or no autorizada

wildcat

[ˈwaɪldkæt] nchat m sauvagewildcat strike ngrève f sauvagewild child n (British)enfant f or m terrible

wildcat

[ˈwaɪldˌkæt] ngatto/a selvatico/a
References in classic literature ?
Your squaws are the mothers of deer; but if a bear, or a wildcat, or a serpent were born among you, ye would flee.
He held out the wildcat bill; she stood as she was, and made no movement.
Think not so vilely of us, Jews though we be,'' said Isaac, eager to improve the moment of apparent sympathy; ``the hunted fox, the tortured wildcat loves its young the despised and persecuted race of Abraham love their children
The general belief that immense fortunes were made by the lucky holders of Bell stock, is an exaggeration that has been kept alive by the promoters of wildcat companies.
If you meet a cat in a wood you think it's a wildcat, though it may have just strolled from the drawing-room sofa.
As it came nearer the Tin Woodman saw that running before the beast was a little gray field mouse, and although he had no heart he knew it was wrong for the Wildcat to try to kill such a pretty, harmless creature.
Skins of wildcat, 'coon, and deer lay about on the pine-board floor.
Time and again he fought it out with Leach who fought back always, like a wildcat, tooth and nail and fist, until stretched, exhausted or unconscious, on the deck.
At that I boiled over, and lifted my hand to strike him; and he, drawing a knife from his rags, squatted back and grinned at me like a wildcat.
I don't know anything about the game, and I should probably run up against some wildcat company.
On those bitter, starlit nights, as we sat around the old stove that fed us and warmed us and kept us cheerful, we could hear the coyotes howling down by the corrals, and their hungry, wintry cry used to remind the boys of wonderful animal stories; about grey wolves and bears in the Rockies, wildcats and panthers in the Virginia mountains.
Sure, an' a bad beatin' it was," he acknowledged, "but yeh showed the grit of a bunch of wildcats.