wildness


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wild

 (wīld)
adj. wild·er, wild·est
1. Occurring, growing, or living in a natural state; not domesticated, cultivated, or tamed: wild geese; edible wild plants.
2. Not inhabited or farmed: remote, wild country.
3. Uncivilized or barbarous.
4.
a. Lacking supervision or restraint: wild children living in the street.
b. Disorderly; unruly: a wild scene in the school cafeteria.
c. Characterized by a lack of moral restraint; dissolute or licentious: recalled his wild youth with remorse.
5. Lacking regular order or arrangement; disarranged: wild locks of long hair.
6. Full of, marked by, or suggestive of strong, uncontrolled emotion: wild with jealousy; a wild look in his eye; a wild rage.
7. Extravagant; fantastic: a wild idea.
8. Furiously disturbed or turbulent; stormy: wild weather.
9. Risky; imprudent: wild financial schemes.
10.
a. Impatiently eager: wild to get away for the weekend.
b. Informal Highly enthusiastic: just wild about the new music.
11. Based on little or no evidence or probability; unfounded: wild accusations; a wild guess.
12. Deviating greatly from an intended course; erratic: a wild bullet.
13. Games Having an equivalence or value determined by the cardholder's choice: playing poker with deuces wild.
adv.
In a wild manner: growing wild; roaming wild.
n.
1. A natural or undomesticated state: returned the zoo animals to the wild; plants that grow abundantly in the wild.
2. often wilds A region that is mostly uninhabited or uncultivated: the wilds of the northern steppes.
intr.v. wild·ed, wild·ing, wilds
To go about in a group threatening, robbing, or attacking others.

[Middle English wilde, from Old English.]

wild′ly adv.
wild′ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wildness - a feeling of extreme emotional intensitywildness - a feeling of extreme emotional intensity; "the wildness of his anger"
passion, passionateness - a strong feeling or emotion
2.wildness - the property of being wild or turbulentwildness - the property of being wild or turbulent; "the storm's violence"
intensiveness, intensity - high level or degree; the property of being intense
savageness, savagery - the property of being untamed and ferocious; "the coastline is littered with testaments to the savageness of the waters"; "a craving for barbaric splendor, for savagery and color and the throb of drums"
3.wildness - an unruly disposition to do as one pleases; "Liza had always had a tendency to wildness"; "the element of wildness in his behavior was a protest against repressive convention"
fractiousness, unruliness, wilfulness, willfulness - the trait of being prone to disobedience and lack of discipline
4.wildness - an intractably barbarous or uncultivated state of nature
intractability, intractableness - the trait of being hard to influence or control
domestication, tameness - the attribute of having been domesticated

wildness

noun
Translations
وَحْشِيَّه
vildskab
tryllingur, ofsi
vahşîlikyabanîlik

wildness

[ˈwaɪldnɪs] N
1. (= undomesticated state) [of animal, tribe, landscape] → estado m salvaje, lo salvaje; [of place] → estado m salvaje or agreste, lo salvaje, lo agreste
2. (= storminess) [of weather] → furia f; [of sea] → bravura f
3. (= lack of restraint) → desenfreno m; [of appearance] → lo desordenado
there was a look of wildness in his eyeshabía algo de locura en su mirada
4. (= craziness, rashness) [of idea, plan, rumour] → lo descabellado, lo disparatado
5. (= haphazardness) [of shot] → lo errático

wildness

[ˈwaɪldnɪs] n
[mountains, landscape] → beauté f sauvage; [life] → tumulte m
He had come to love the danger and the wildness of his life → Il avait appris à aimer le danger et le tumulte de sa vie.
[person] → côté m tout-fou
[eyes, expression] → lueur f sauvage
She stared at him with wildness in her eyes → Elle le fixait, une lueur sauvage dans ses yeux.wild rice nriz m sauvageWild West n
the Wild West → le Far West

wildness

n
(= rough, uncivilized state)Wildheit f
(of storm etc)Wildheit f, → Stärke f, → Heftigkeit f; the wildness of the weatherdas rauhe or stürmische Wetter
(= frenzy, unruliness)Wildheit f
(= extravagance) (of promise)Unüberlegtheit f; (of exaggeration)Maßlosigkeit f; (of fluctuations)Stärke f; (of expectations, imagination)Kühnheit f
(= lack of aim)Unkontrolliertheit f; (= erratic nature: of spelling) → Unsicherheit f

wildness

[ˈwaɪldnɪs] n (gen) → violenza; (of countryside, scenery) → aspetto selvaggio; (of the weather) → avversità
the wildness of his appearance → il suo aspetto selvaggio
the wildness of her imagination → la sua fervida immaginazione

wild

(waild) adjective
1. (of animals) not tamed. wolves and other wild animals.
2. (of land) not cultivated.
3. uncivilized or lawless; savage. wild tribes.
4. very stormy; violent. a wild night at sea; a wild rage.
5. mad, crazy, insane etc. wild with hunger; wild with anxiety.
6. rash. a wild hope.
7. not accurate or reliable. a wild guess.
8. very angry.
ˈwildly adverb
ˈwildness noun
ˈwildfire: spread like wildfire
(of eg news) to spread extremely fast.
ˈwildfowl noun plural
wild birds, especially water birds such as ducks, geese etc.
ˌwild-ˈgoose chase
an attempt to catch or find something one cannot possibly obtain.
ˈwildlife noun
wild animals, birds, insects etc collectively. to protect wildlife.
in the wild
(of an animal) in its natural surroundings. Young animals have to learn to look after themselves in the wild.
the wilds
the uncultivated areas (of a country etc). They're living out in the wilds of Australia somewhere.
the Wild Westwest
References in classic literature ?
His eye, alone, which glistened like a fiery star amid lowering clouds, was to be seen in its state of native wildness.
She impregnated it, too, not with a wild-flower scent, --for wildness was no trait of hers,--but with the perfume of garden-roses, pinks, and other blossoms of much sweetness, which nature and man have consented together in making grow from summer to summer, and from century to century.
It may seem marvellous that, with the world before her -- kept by no restrictive clause of her condemnation within the limits of the Puritan settlement, so remote and so obscure -- free to return to her birth-place, or to any other European land, and there hide her character and identity under a new exterior, as completely as if emerging into another state of being -- and having also the passes of the dark, inscrutable forest open to her, where the wildness of her nature might assimilate itself with a people whose customs and life were alien from the law that had condemned her -- it may seem marvellous that this woman should still call that place her home, where, and where only, she must needs be the type of shame.
I only knew that at the end of, I suppose, a quarter of an hour, an odorous dampness and roughness, chilling and piercing my trouble, had made me understand that I must have thrown myself, on my face, on the ground and given way to a wildness of grief.
But if such an hypothesis be indeed exceptionable, there were still additional considerations which, though not so strictly according with the wildness of his ruling passion, yet were by no means incapable of swaying him.
She was looking steadily into the blaze, with a calm, heart-broken expression, very different from her former agitated wildness.
I wish to speak a word for Nature, for absolute freedom and wildness, as contrasted with a freedom and culture merely civil--to regard man as an inhabitant, or a part and parcel of Nature, rather than a member of society.
It is beautiful--a mixture of sylvan loveliness and craggy wildness.
Two delighful twilight walks on the third and fourth evenings of her being there, not merely on the dry gravel of the shrubbery, but all over the grounds, and especially in the most distant parts of them, where there was something more of wildness than in the rest, where the trees were the oldest, and the grass was the longest and wettest, had--assisted by the still greater imprudence of sitting in her wet shoes and stockings--given Marianne a cold so violent as, though for a day or two trifled with or denied, would force itself by increasing ailments on the concern of every body, and the notice of herself.
I hemmed once more, and drew closer to the hearth, repeating my comment on the wildness of the evening.
She turned on me in such a frenzied manner, when I tried to raise her from the ground -- she looked at me with such a fearful wildness in her eyes -- that I felt absolutely terrified at the sight of her.
With the look fixed upon him, in her paleness and wildness, she panted out in his arms, imploringly, "O my dear friend