wildness


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wild

 (wīld)
adj. wild·er, wild·est
1. Occurring, growing, or living in a natural state; not domesticated, cultivated, or tamed: wild geese; edible wild plants.
2. Not inhabited or farmed: remote, wild country.
3. Uncivilized or barbarous.
4.
a. Lacking supervision or restraint: wild children living in the street.
b. Disorderly; unruly: a wild scene in the school cafeteria.
c. Characterized by a lack of moral restraint; dissolute or licentious: recalled his wild youth with remorse.
5. Lacking regular order or arrangement; disarranged: wild locks of long hair.
6. Full of, marked by, or suggestive of strong, uncontrolled emotion: wild with jealousy; a wild look in his eye; a wild rage.
7. Extravagant; fantastic: a wild idea.
8. Furiously disturbed or turbulent; stormy: wild weather.
9. Risky; imprudent: wild financial schemes.
10.
a. Impatiently eager: wild to get away for the weekend.
b. Informal Highly enthusiastic: just wild about the new music.
11. Based on little or no evidence or probability; unfounded: wild accusations; a wild guess.
12. Deviating greatly from an intended course; erratic: a wild bullet.
13. Games Having an equivalence or value determined by the cardholder's choice: playing poker with deuces wild.
adv.
In a wild manner: growing wild; roaming wild.
n.
1. A natural or undomesticated state: returned the zoo animals to the wild; plants that grow abundantly in the wild.
2. often wilds A region that is mostly uninhabited or uncultivated: the wilds of the northern steppes.
intr.v. wild·ed, wild·ing, wilds
To go about in a group threatening, robbing, or attacking others.

[Middle English wilde, from Old English.]

wild′ly adv.
wild′ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wildness - a feeling of extreme emotional intensitywildness - a feeling of extreme emotional intensity; "the wildness of his anger"
passion, passionateness - a strong feeling or emotion
2.wildness - the property of being wild or turbulentwildness - the property of being wild or turbulent; "the storm's violence"
intensiveness, intensity - high level or degree; the property of being intense
savageness, savagery - the property of being untamed and ferocious; "the coastline is littered with testaments to the savageness of the waters"; "a craving for barbaric splendor, for savagery and color and the throb of drums"
3.wildness - an unruly disposition to do as one pleases; "Liza had always had a tendency to wildness"; "the element of wildness in his behavior was a protest against repressive convention"
fractiousness, unruliness, wilfulness, willfulness - the trait of being prone to disobedience and lack of discipline
4.wildness - an intractably barbarous or uncultivated state of nature
intractability, intractableness - the trait of being hard to influence or control
domestication, tameness - the attribute of having been domesticated

wildness

noun
Translations
وَحْشِيَّه
vildskab
tryllingur, ofsi
vahşîlikyabanîlik

wildness

[ˈwaɪldnɪs] N
1. (= undomesticated state) [of animal, tribe, landscape] → estado m salvaje, lo salvaje; [of place] → estado m salvaje or agreste, lo salvaje, lo agreste
2. (= storminess) [of weather] → furia f; [of sea] → bravura f
3. (= lack of restraint) → desenfreno m; [of appearance] → lo desordenado
there was a look of wildness in his eyeshabía algo de locura en su mirada
4. (= craziness, rashness) [of idea, plan, rumour] → lo descabellado, lo disparatado
5. (= haphazardness) [of shot] → lo errático

wildness

[ˈwaɪldnɪs] n
[mountains, landscape] → beauté f sauvage; [life] → tumulte m
He had come to love the danger and the wildness of his life → Il avait appris à aimer le danger et le tumulte de sa vie.
[person] → côté m tout-fou
[eyes, expression] → lueur f sauvage
She stared at him with wildness in her eyes → Elle le fixait, une lueur sauvage dans ses yeux.wild rice nriz m sauvageWild West n
the Wild West → le Far West

wildness

n
(= rough, uncivilized state)Wildheit f
(of storm etc)Wildheit f, → Stärke f, → Heftigkeit f; the wildness of the weatherdas rauhe or stürmische Wetter
(= frenzy, unruliness)Wildheit f
(= extravagance) (of promise)Unüberlegtheit f; (of exaggeration)Maßlosigkeit f; (of fluctuations)Stärke f; (of expectations, imagination)Kühnheit f
(= lack of aim)Unkontrolliertheit f; (= erratic nature: of spelling) → Unsicherheit f

wildness

[ˈwaɪldnɪs] n (gen) → violenza; (of countryside, scenery) → aspetto selvaggio; (of the weather) → avversità
the wildness of his appearance → il suo aspetto selvaggio
the wildness of her imagination → la sua fervida immaginazione

wild

(waild) adjective
1. (of animals) not tamed. wolves and other wild animals.
2. (of land) not cultivated.
3. uncivilized or lawless; savage. wild tribes.
4. very stormy; violent. a wild night at sea; a wild rage.
5. mad, crazy, insane etc. wild with hunger; wild with anxiety.
6. rash. a wild hope.
7. not accurate or reliable. a wild guess.
8. very angry.
ˈwildly adverb
ˈwildness noun
ˈwildfire: spread like wildfire
(of eg news) to spread extremely fast.
ˈwildfowl noun plural
wild birds, especially water birds such as ducks, geese etc.
ˌwild-ˈgoose chase
an attempt to catch or find something one cannot possibly obtain.
ˈwildlife noun
wild animals, birds, insects etc collectively. to protect wildlife.
in the wild
(of an animal) in its natural surroundings. Young animals have to learn to look after themselves in the wild.
the wilds
the uncultivated areas (of a country etc). They're living out in the wilds of Australia somewhere.
the Wild Westwest
References in classic literature ?
For a true expression of dishevelled wildness there is nothing like a gale in the bright moonlight of a high latitude.
The enthusiastic seemed in the wildness of the Walpurgisnacht to hear the rattle of artillery at Gravelotte.
This, it is true, would of itself alone never have been able to eradicate Jones from his bosom; but it was greatly injurious to him, and prepared Mr Allworthy's mind for those impressions which afterwards produced the mighty events that will be contained hereafter in this history; and to which, it must be confest, the unfortunate lad, by his own wantonness, wildness, and want of caution, too much contributed.
At certain intervals, the original wildness broke out in the natures of Brutus and Cassius.
But if such an hypothesis be indeed exceptionable, there were still additional considerations which, though not so strictly according with the wildness of his ruling passion, yet were by no means incapable of swaying him.
I wish to speak a word for Nature, for absolute freedom and wildness, as contrasted with a freedom and culture merely civil--to regard man as an inhabitant, or a part and parcel of Nature, rather than a member of society.
But fear of man is slowly acquired, as I have elsewhere shown, by various animals inhabiting desert islands; and we may see an instance of this, even in England, in the greater wildness of all our large birds than of our small birds; for the large birds have been most persecuted by man.
As I once more shouldered my pack and went my way, the character of the country side began to change, and, from a semi- pastoral heathiness and furziness, took on a wildness of aspect, which if indeed melodramatic was melodrama carried to the point of genius.
I may have caught something of the natural wildness of my companions.
Mohegan was seated on the trunk of a fallen oak, with his tawny visage turned toward her, and his eyes fixed on her face with an expression of wildness and fire, that would have terrified a less resolute female.
I only knew that at the end of, I suppose, a quarter of an hour, an odorous dampness and roughness, chilling and piercing my trouble, had made me understand that I must have thrown myself, on my face, on the ground and given way to a wildness of grief.
Two delighful twilight walks on the third and fourth evenings of her being there, not merely on the dry gravel of the shrubbery, but all over the grounds, and especially in the most distant parts of them, where there was something more of wildness than in the rest, where the trees were the oldest, and the grass was the longest and wettest, had--assisted by the still greater imprudence of sitting in her wet shoes and stockings--given Marianne a cold so violent as, though for a day or two trifled with or denied, would force itself by increasing ailments on the concern of every body, and the notice of herself.