wile


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wile

 (wīl)
n.
1. A stratagem or trick intended to deceive or ensnare.
2. A disarming or seductive manner, device, or procedure: the wiles of a skilled negotiator.
tr.v. wiled, wil·ing, wiles
1. To influence or lead by means of wiles; entice: "Could the Erl-king's Daughter have revealed herself to me ... she might have wiled me by the hand into the dimmest forests upon earth" (Thomas De Quincey).
2. To pass (time) agreeably: wile away a Sunday afternoon.

[Middle English wil, from Old North French, from Old Norse vēl, trick, or of Low German origin. V., sense 2, influenced by while.]
Synonyms: wile, artifice, trick, ruse, feint, stratagem, maneuver, dodge
These nouns denote means for achieving an end by indirection or deviousness. Wile suggests deceiving and entrapping a victim by playing on his or her weak points: "Eve yielded to the wiles of the arch tempter" (James Joyce).
Artifice refers to something especially contrived to create a desired effect: "Should the public forgive artifices used to avoid military service?" (Godfrey Sperling).
Trick implies willful deception: "The ... boys ... had all sorts of tricks to prevent us from winning" (W.H. Hudson).
Ruse stresses the creation of a false impression: "It is perfidy to use a flag of truce as a ruse to acquire military information or to play for time to retreat" (Thaddeus Holt).
Feint denotes a deceptive act calculated to distract attention from one's real purpose: "Rob ... sat staring at him, and affecting to snivel with sympathy, and making a feint of being virtuous, and treasuring up every word he said (like a young spy as he was) with very promising deceit" (Charles Dickens).
Stratagem implies carefully planned deception used to achieve an objective: "He was ... daring in the administrative stratagems he employed to bring himself to the attention of his superiors" (Joseph Heller).
Maneuver and dodge stress shifty and ingenious deception: "[He] was being accused of shady banking maneuvers and abusing his influence for his own financial gain" (Porter Shreve)."At my age one has had a considerable experience of the ins and outs, the dodges that accompany self-interest" (Saul Bellow).

wile

(waɪl)
n
1. trickery, cunning, or craftiness
2. (usually plural) an artful or seductive trick or ploy
vb
(tr) to lure, beguile, or entice
[C12: from Old Norse vel craft; probably related to Old French wīle, Old English wīgle magic. See guile]

wile

(waɪl)

n., v. wiled, wil•ing. n.
1. a trick, artifice, or stratagem meant to fool, trap, or entice.
2. wiles, artful or beguiling behavior.
3. deceitful cunning; trickery.
v.t.
4. to beguile, entice, or lure (usu. fol. by away, from, into, etc.): The music wiled him from his study.
5. wile away, to spend or pass (time), esp. in a leisurely or pleasurable fashion.
[1125–75; (n.) Middle English; late Old English wil]

wile


Past participle: wiled
Gerund: wiling

Imperative
wile
wile
Present
I wile
you wile
he/she/it wiles
we wile
you wile
they wile
Preterite
I wiled
you wiled
he/she/it wiled
we wiled
you wiled
they wiled
Present Continuous
I am wiling
you are wiling
he/she/it is wiling
we are wiling
you are wiling
they are wiling
Present Perfect
I have wiled
you have wiled
he/she/it has wiled
we have wiled
you have wiled
they have wiled
Past Continuous
I was wiling
you were wiling
he/she/it was wiling
we were wiling
you were wiling
they were wiling
Past Perfect
I had wiled
you had wiled
he/she/it had wiled
we had wiled
you had wiled
they had wiled
Future
I will wile
you will wile
he/she/it will wile
we will wile
you will wile
they will wile
Future Perfect
I will have wiled
you will have wiled
he/she/it will have wiled
we will have wiled
you will have wiled
they will have wiled
Future Continuous
I will be wiling
you will be wiling
he/she/it will be wiling
we will be wiling
you will be wiling
they will be wiling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been wiling
you have been wiling
he/she/it has been wiling
we have been wiling
you have been wiling
they have been wiling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been wiling
you will have been wiling
he/she/it will have been wiling
we will have been wiling
you will have been wiling
they will have been wiling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been wiling
you had been wiling
he/she/it had been wiling
we had been wiling
you had been wiling
they had been wiling
Conditional
I would wile
you would wile
he/she/it would wile
we would wile
you would wile
they would wile
Past Conditional
I would have wiled
you would have wiled
he/she/it would have wiled
we would have wiled
you would have wiled
they would have wiled
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wile - the use of tricks to deceive someone (usually to extract money from them)wile - the use of tricks to deceive someone (usually to extract money from them)
dissimulation, deception, dissembling, deceit - the act of deceiving
dupery, hoax, put-on, humbug, fraud, fraudulence - something intended to deceive; deliberate trickery intended to gain an advantage
jugglery - artful trickery designed to achieve an end; "the senator's tax program was mere jugglery"

wile

noun
An indirect, usually cunning means of gaining an end:
Informal: shenanigan, take-in.
verb
To pass (time) without working or in avoiding work.Also used with away:
dawdle (away), fiddle away, idle (away), kill, trifle away, waste, while (away).
Translations

wile

n usu plList f, → Schliche pl; she used all her wiles to persuade himsie ließ ihren ganzen Charme spielen, um ihn zu überreden
References in classic literature ?
Now, my friends," said she, "to wile away the time till the bright moon goes down, let us each tell a tale, or relate what we have done or learned this day.
Gales have their personalities, and, after all, perhaps it is not strange; for, when all is said and done, they are adversaries whose wiles you must defeat, whose violence you must resist, and yet with whom you must live in the intimacies of nights and days.
I, WHO erewhile the happy Garden sung By one man's disobedience lost, now sing Recovered Paradise to all mankind, By one man's firm obedience fully tried Through all temptation, and the Tempter foiled In all his wiles, defeated and repulsed, And Eden raised in the waste Wilderness.
Young Love's first lesson is -- the heart: For 'mid that sunshine, and those smiles, When, from our little cares apart, And laughing at her girlish wiles, I'd throw me on her throbbing breast, And pour my spirit out in tears - There was no need to speak the rest - No need to quiet any fears Of her - who ask'd no reason why, But turn'd on me her quiet eye!
There were one or two men whom she observed at the soiree musicale; but she would never have felt moved to any kittenish display to attract their notice--to any feline or feminine wiles to express herself toward them.
You alone have escaped the wiles of these animals, therefore you must be under the special protection of Heaven.
They know from experience that they sometimes err; and the wonder is that they so seldom err as they do, beset, as they continually are, by the wiles of parasites and sycophants, by the snares of the ambitious, the avaricious, the desperate, by the artifices of men who possess their confidence more than they deserve it, and of those who seek to possess rather than to deserve it.
How could you, my poor little unfledged nestling, find yourself food, and defend yourself from misfortune, and ward off the wiles of evil men?
They affected a frank and friendly demeanor; but their appearance and movements awakened the suspicions of some of the veteran trappers, well versed in Indian wiles.
You are a young gentleman, and do not know half their artful wiles.
Again I call out all my diplomacy, and again as soon as the thing was about at an end, our friend the government clerk gets hot and red, and his sausages stand on end with wrath, and once more I launch out into diplomatic wiles.
So she (Europa) crossed the briny water from afar to Crete, beguiled by the wiles of Zeus.