wilful


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wil·ful

 (wĭl′fəl)
adj.
Variant of willful.

wilful

(ˈwɪlfʊl) or

willful

adj
1. intent on having one's own way; headstrong or obstinate
2. intentional: wilful murder.
ˈwilfully, ˈwillfully adv
ˈwilfulness, ˈwillfulness n

will•ful

or wil•ful

(ˈwɪl fəl)

adj.
1. deliberate, voluntary, or intentional: willful murder.
2. unreasonably stubborn or headstrong; perversely obstinate.
[1150–1200]
will′ful•ly, adv.
will′ful•ness, n.
syn: willful, headstrong, perverse, wayward refer to a person who stubbornly persists in doing as he or she pleases. willful implies opposition to those whose wishes, suggestions, or commands ought to be respected or obeyed: a willful son who ignored his parents' advice. headstrong is used in a similar way, but implies foolish and sometimes reckless behavior: headstrong teens who could not be restrained. perverse implies stubborn persistence in opposing what is right or acceptable, often with the express intention of being contrary or disagreeable: taking a perverse delight in arguing with others. wayward suggests stubborn disobedience that gets one into trouble: a reform school for wayward youths.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.wilful - done by design; "the insult was intentional"; "willful disobedience"
voluntary - of your own free will or design; done by choice; not forced or compelled; "man is a voluntary agent"; "participation was voluntary"; "voluntary manslaughter"; "voluntary generosity in times of disaster"; "voluntary social workers"; "a voluntary confession"
2.wilful - habitually disposed to disobedience and opposition
disobedient - not obeying or complying with commands of those in authority; "disobedient children"

wilful

willful

also wilfull
adjective
Translations
bevidststædig
òrárvísvitandi

wilful

willful (US) [ˈwɪlfʊl] ADJ
1. (= obstinate) → testarudo, terco
2. (= deliberate) → intencionado, deliberado, premeditado; [murder etc] → premeditado

wilful

[ˈwɪlfʊl] willful (US) adj
(= stubborn) [person] → obstiné(e)
(= deliberate) [action] → intentionnel(le); [crime] → intentionnel(le)

wilful

, (US) willful
adj
(= self-willed)eigensinnig, eigenwillig
(= deliberate) neglect, damage, wastemutwillig; murdervorsätzlich; disobediencewissentlich

wilful

willful (Am) [ˈwɪlfʊl] adj (deliberate, act) → intenzionale, premeditato/a; (self-willed) → testardo/a, ostinato/a

will

(wil) noun
1. the mental power by which one controls one's thought, actions and decisions. Do you believe in freedom of the will?
2. (control over) one's desire(s) or wish(es); determination. It was done against her will; He has no will of his own – he always does what the others want; Children often have strong wills; He has lost the will to live.
3. (a legal paper having written on it) a formal statement about what is to be done with one's belongings, body etc after one's death. Have you made a will yet?
verbshort forms I'll (ail) , you'll (juːl) , he'll (hiːl) , she'll (ʃiːl) , it'll (ˈitl) , we'll (wiːl) , they'll (ðeil) : negative short form won't (wount)
1. used to form future tenses of other verbs. We'll go at six o'clock tonight; Will you be here again next week?; Things will never be the same again; I will have finished the work by tomorrow evening.
2. used in requests or commands. Will you come into my office for a moment, please?; Will you please stop talking!
3. used to show willingness. I'll do that for you if you like; I won't do it!
4. used to state that something happens regularly, is quite normal etc. Accidents will happen.
ˈwilful adjective
1. obstinate.
2. intentional. wilful damage to property.
ˈwilfully adverb
ˈwilfulness noun
-willed
weak-willed / strong-willed people.
ˈwilling adjective
ready to agree (to do something). a willing helper; She's willing to help in any way she can.
ˈwillingly adverb
ˈwillingness noun
ˈwillpower noun
the determination to do something. I don't have the willpower to stop smoking.
at will
as, or when, one chooses.
with a will
eagerly and energetically. They set about (doing) their tasks with a will.
References in classic literature ?
M'Lellan turned a deaf ear to every remonstrance, and kept on his wilful way.
Churchill's removal to London had been of no service to the wilful or nervous part of her disorder.
He had not then talked to me of employment, of ships, of being ready to take another command; but he had discoursed of his early days, in the abundant but thin flow of a wilful invalid's talk.
I am afraid, however, that nothing will do her good until she consents to take more care of herself; I am afraid she is very wild and wilful, and mamma tells me that all this month it has taken papa's positive orders to make her stop in-doors.
I have only to add, that the verdict at the Coroner's Inquest was Wilful Murder against some person, or persons, unknown.
No, but I was brought up in Corsica; you are old and obstinate, I am young and wilful.
This wilful world hath not got hold of unchristian Solomon's wisdom yet.
His excellency observed my countenance to clear up; he told me, with a sigh, "that there his estate began, and would continue the same, till we should come to his house: that his countrymen ridiculed and despised him, for managing his affairs no better, and for setting so ill an example to the kingdom; which, however, was followed by very few, such as were old, and wilful, and weak like himself.
To such perseverance in wilful self-deception Elizabeth would make no reply, and immediately and in silence withdrew, determined, that if he persisted in considering her repeated refusals as flattering encouragement, to apply to her father, whose negative might be uttered in such a manner as to be decisive, and whose behavior at least could not be mistaken for the affectation and coquetry of an elegant female.
Then is she kind and cruel, stately and unassuming, various, beautifully wilful.
Isabella could not be aware of the pain she was inflicting; but it was a degree of wilful thoughtlessness which Catherine could not but resent.
From a letter of my great-grandmother's written to a stubborn daughter upon some unfilial behavior, like running away to be married, I suspect that she was fond of the high-colored fiction of her day, for she tells the wilful child that she has "planted a dagger in her mother's heart," and I should not be surprised if it were from this fine-languaged lady that my grandfather derived his taste for poetry rather than from his father, who was of a worldly wiser mind.