wilful


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wil·ful

 (wĭl′fəl)
adj.
Variant of willful.

wilful

(ˈwɪlfʊl) or

willful

adj
1. intent on having one's own way; headstrong or obstinate
2. intentional: wilful murder.
ˈwilfully, ˈwillfully adv
ˈwilfulness, ˈwillfulness n

will•ful

or wil•ful

(ˈwɪl fəl)

adj.
1. deliberate, voluntary, or intentional: willful murder.
2. unreasonably stubborn or headstrong; perversely obstinate.
[1150–1200]
will′ful•ly, adv.
will′ful•ness, n.
syn: willful, headstrong, perverse, wayward refer to a person who stubbornly persists in doing as he or she pleases. willful implies opposition to those whose wishes, suggestions, or commands ought to be respected or obeyed: a willful son who ignored his parents' advice. headstrong is used in a similar way, but implies foolish and sometimes reckless behavior: headstrong teens who could not be restrained. perverse implies stubborn persistence in opposing what is right or acceptable, often with the express intention of being contrary or disagreeable: taking a perverse delight in arguing with others. wayward suggests stubborn disobedience that gets one into trouble: a reform school for wayward youths.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.wilful - done by design; "the insult was intentional"; "willful disobedience"
voluntary - of your own free will or design; done by choice; not forced or compelled; "man is a voluntary agent"; "participation was voluntary"; "voluntary manslaughter"; "voluntary generosity in times of disaster"; "voluntary social workers"; "a voluntary confession"
2.wilful - habitually disposed to disobedience and opposition
disobedient - not obeying or complying with commands of those in authority; "disobedient children"

wilful

willful

also wilfull
adjective
Translations
bevidststædig
òrárvísvitandi

wilful

willful (US) [ˈwɪlfʊl] ADJ
1. (= obstinate) → testarudo, terco
2. (= deliberate) → intencionado, deliberado, premeditado; [murder etc] → premeditado

wilful

[ˈwɪlfʊl] willful (US) adj
(= stubborn) [person] → obstiné(e)
(= deliberate) [action] → intentionnel(le); [crime] → intentionnel(le)

wilful

, (US) willful
adj
(= self-willed)eigensinnig, eigenwillig
(= deliberate) neglect, damage, wastemutwillig; murdervorsätzlich; disobediencewissentlich

wilful

willful (Am) [ˈwɪlfʊl] adj (deliberate, act) → intenzionale, premeditato/a; (self-willed) → testardo/a, ostinato/a

will

(wil) noun
1. the mental power by which one controls one's thought, actions and decisions. Do you believe in freedom of the will?
2. (control over) one's desire(s) or wish(es); determination. It was done against her will; He has no will of his own – he always does what the others want; Children often have strong wills; He has lost the will to live.
3. (a legal paper having written on it) a formal statement about what is to be done with one's belongings, body etc after one's death. Have you made a will yet?
verbshort forms I'll (ail) , you'll (juːl) , he'll (hiːl) , she'll (ʃiːl) , it'll (ˈitl) , we'll (wiːl) , they'll (ðeil) : negative short form won't (wount)
1. used to form future tenses of other verbs. We'll go at six o'clock tonight; Will you be here again next week?; Things will never be the same again; I will have finished the work by tomorrow evening.
2. used in requests or commands. Will you come into my office for a moment, please?; Will you please stop talking!
3. used to show willingness. I'll do that for you if you like; I won't do it!
4. used to state that something happens regularly, is quite normal etc. Accidents will happen.
ˈwilful adjective
1. obstinate.
2. intentional. wilful damage to property.
ˈwilfully adverb
ˈwilfulness noun
-willed
weak-willed / strong-willed people.
ˈwilling adjective
ready to agree (to do something). a willing helper; She's willing to help in any way she can.
ˈwillingly adverb
ˈwillingness noun
ˈwillpower noun
the determination to do something. I don't have the willpower to stop smoking.
at will
as, or when, one chooses.
with a will
eagerly and energetically. They set about (doing) their tasks with a will.
References in classic literature ?
Jo" on the next lid, scratched and worn, And within a motley store Of headless, dolls, of schoolbooks torn, Birds and beasts that speak no more, Spoils brought home from the fairy ground Only trod by youthful feet, Dreams of a future never found, Memories of a past still sweet, Half-writ poems, stories wild, April letters, warm and cold, Diaries of a wilful child, Hints of a woman early old, A woman in a lonely home, Hearing, like a sad refrain-- "Be worthy, love, and love will come," In the falling summer rain.
As with all sinners among men, the sin of this son of Amittai was in his wilful disobedience of the command of God --never mind now what that command was, or how conveyed --which he found a hard command.
This wilful world hath not got hold of unchristian Solomon's wisdom yet.
Young boys, when they comes to your age, is wilful, sometimes-- it is natur they should be.
Churchill's removal to London had been of no service to the wilful or nervous part of her disorder.
I, having vainly begged the wilful girl to rise and remove her wet things, left him preaching and her shivering, and betook myself to bed with little Hareton, who slept as fast as if everyone had been sleeping round him.
cried my mother, turning from one of us to the other, in her pettish wilful manner, 'what a troublesome world this is, when one has the most right to expect it to be as agreeable as possible
In this cozy state of mind we came to the verdict Wilful Murder.
To have sought a medical explanation for this phenomenon would have been held by Silas himself, as well as by his minister and fellow-members, a wilful self-exclusion from the spiritual significance that might lie therein.
No more be mention'd then of violence Against our selves, and wilful barrenness, That cuts us off from hope, and savours onely Rancor and pride, impatience and despite, Reluctance against God and his just yoke Laid on our Necks.
Nay, then, if wilful will to water, wilful must drench.
His excellency observed my countenance to clear up; he told me, with a sigh, "that there his estate began, and would continue the same, till we should come to his house: that his countrymen ridiculed and despised him, for managing his affairs no better, and for setting so ill an example to the kingdom; which, however, was followed by very few, such as were old, and wilful, and weak like himself.