willie


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Related to willie: Willie Mays

wil·lie

 (wĭl′ē)
n. Chiefly British Vulgar Slang
The penis.

[From Willie, nickname for William.]

willie

(ˈwɪlɪ)
n
(Anatomy) a variant spelling of willy
Translations

willie

n (Brit inf: = penis) → Pimmel m (inf)

willie

willy [ˈwɪlɪ] n (Brit) (fam) → pisello (fig)
References in classic literature ?
There's a horse, Willie, that has known better days.
If it were your Harry, mother, or your Willie, that were going to be torn from you by a brutal trader, tomorrow morning,--if you had seen the man, and heard that the papers were signed and delivered, and you had only from twelve o'clock till morning to make good your escape,--how fast could you walk?
Ward; lawyer Riverson, the new notable from a dis- tance; next the belle of the village, followed by a troop of lawn-clad and ribbon-decked young heart-breakers; then all the young clerks in town in a body -- for they had stood in the vestibule sucking their cane-heads, a circling wall of oiled and simpering admirers, till the last girl had run their gantlet; and last of all came the Model Boy, Willie Mufferson, taking as heedful care of his mother as if she were cut glass.
When we came to 'Here's a hand, my trusty frere', we all joined hands round the table; and when we declared we would 'take a right gude Willie Waught', and hadn't the least idea what it meant, we were really affected.
I am not different from Willie Grimsby, or any other of the fellows who have been to see him.
William James figured there as well as "Weary Willie," and pragmatists alternated with pugilists in the long procession of its portraits.
Quoth he to himself, "I would I had Willie Wynkin's wishing coat; I know right well what I should wish for, and this it should be.
From far off he could hear a childish treble singing: "Waltz me around again, Willie, around, around, around.
Annette ought to be horse sometimes and not always driver; and Willie may as well make up his mind to let Marion build her house by his, for she will do it, and he needn't fuss about it.
Here am I upholding the good fame of the learned Duns Scotus against the foolish quibblings and poor silly reasonings of Willie Ockham.
Kinmont Willie is very fine, but seems to be largely the work of Sir Walter Scott and therefore not truly 'popular.
Willie, the eighteen-year-old son, who attends the New York public school, is absorbed in the weekly article describing how to make over an old skirt, for he hopes to take a prize in sewing on graduation day.