willpower


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will·pow·er

or will pow·er  (wĭl′pou′ər)
n.
The strength of will to carry out one's decisions, wishes, or plans.

willpower

(ˈwɪlˌpaʊə)
n
1. the ability to control oneself and determine one's actions
2. firmness of will

will′pow`er

or will′ pow`er,


n.
control of one's impulses and actions; determination; self-control.
[1870–75]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.willpower - the trait of resolutely controlling your own behaviorwillpower - the trait of resolutely controlling your own behavior
firmness of purpose, resoluteness, resolve, firmness, resolution - the trait of being resolute; "his resoluteness carried him through the battle"; "it was his unshakeable resolution to finish the work"
nerves - control of your emotions; "this kind of tension is not good for my nerves"
presence of mind - self-control in a crisis; ability to say or do the right thing in an emergency

willpower

noun self-control, drive, resolution, resolve, determination, grit, self-discipline, single-mindedness, fixity of purpose, firmness of purpose or will, force or strength of will She doesn't have the willpower to give up smoking.
weakness, uncertainty, apathy, indecision, lethargy, hesitancy, torpor, languor, shilly-shallying (informal), irresolution

willpower

or will power
noun
Translations
قُوَّةُ الإرَادَةقُوَّة الإرادَه
síla vůle
viljestyrke
tahtejõud
tahdonvoima
snaga volje
akaraterõ
viljastyrkur
意志の力
의지력
sila vôle
viljestyrka
iradeirade gücü
sức mạnh ý chí

willpower

[ˈwɪlpaʊəʳ] Nfuerza f de voluntad

willpower

[ˈwɪlpaʊər] nforce f de volonté
His attempts to stop smoking by willpower alone failed → Ses tentatives pour arrêter de fumer par la seule force de la volonté ont échoué.

willpower

nWillenskraft f

willpower

[ˈwɪlˌpaʊəʳ] nforza di volontà

will

(wil) noun
1. the mental power by which one controls one's thought, actions and decisions. Do you believe in freedom of the will?
2. (control over) one's desire(s) or wish(es); determination. It was done against her will; He has no will of his own – he always does what the others want; Children often have strong wills; He has lost the will to live.
3. (a legal paper having written on it) a formal statement about what is to be done with one's belongings, body etc after one's death. Have you made a will yet?
verbshort forms I'll (ail) , you'll (juːl) , he'll (hiːl) , she'll (ʃiːl) , it'll (ˈitl) , we'll (wiːl) , they'll (ðeil) : negative short form won't (wount)
1. used to form future tenses of other verbs. We'll go at six o'clock tonight; Will you be here again next week?; Things will never be the same again; I will have finished the work by tomorrow evening.
2. used in requests or commands. Will you come into my office for a moment, please?; Will you please stop talking!
3. used to show willingness. I'll do that for you if you like; I won't do it!
4. used to state that something happens regularly, is quite normal etc. Accidents will happen.
ˈwilful adjective
1. obstinate.
2. intentional. wilful damage to property.
ˈwilfully adverb
ˈwilfulness noun
-willed
weak-willed / strong-willed people.
ˈwilling adjective
ready to agree (to do something). a willing helper; She's willing to help in any way she can.
ˈwillingly adverb
ˈwillingness noun
ˈwillpower noun
the determination to do something. I don't have the willpower to stop smoking.
at will
as, or when, one chooses.
with a will
eagerly and energetically. They set about (doing) their tasks with a will.

willpower

قُوَّةُ الإرَادَة síla vůle viljestyrke Willenskraft δύναμη θέλησης fuerza de voluntad tahdonvoima force de volonté snaga volje forza di volontà 意志の力 의지력 wilskracht viljestyrke siła woli força de vontade сила воли viljestyrka ความตั้งใจและความมีวินัยที่นำตัวเองไปสู่ความสำเร็จ irade sức mạnh ý chí 毅力
References in periodicals archive ?
Tsipursky stressed the importance of commitment to toughen up willpower and be able to achieve goals.
Employing a fitness metaphor apropos to an Olympic year, the authors liken willpower to a muscle that can be strengthened through exercise but can be fatigued with vigorous short-term use.
New research shows that fear is programmed into humans at the cellular level--which is why willpower often doesn't achieve the succession of stress.
A joint study by UOWD, Zayed University and Emirates Aviation College reveals that global investors are more likely to invest in individuals with integrity, willpower, commitment and passion than those with a good business plan alone.
Dubai -- A study by a team of researchers from three UAE universities has revealed that entrepreneurs who display integrity, willpower, commitment and passion are more likely to gain funding from private investors than those who have just a sound business plan.
Payot asserts that genius is, above all, a long process of patience: scientific and literary works that honour human talent the most are not at all due to the superiority of intelligence, like it is generally believed, but instead to the superiority of a willpower that is admirably owner of itself.
Those who get to grips with the mental side of things by tackling willpower and motivation are the most successful at keeping their weight loss resolution.
One of the main reasons resolutions - or other efforts at change - fail is because people often attempt to use willpower and willpower is weak.
Some will argue that this is a lack of willpower, which is maybe true but in reality it is much more than that.
Here's a refresher on it: Looking to understand how willpower develops and manifests, Mischel presented preschoolers with a scenario designed to measure self-control.
In a fair fight with a worthy opponent you showed fighting spirit, strong willpower and great physical fitness, as well as reaffirmed your leadership and raised the image of Kazakhstan at the international level.
The authors of a recent study hypothesized that the effect of glucose also depended on people's theories about willpower.