wincing


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Related to wincing: misattributed

wince

 (wĭns)
intr.v. winced, winc·ing, winc·es
To shrink or start involuntarily, as in pain or distress; flinch.
n.
A shrinking or startled movement or gesture.

[Middle English wincen, to kick, from Old North French *wencier, variant of Old French guencir, of Germanic origin.]

winc′er n.
References in classic literature ?
He passed his hand over his eyes, made a little wincing grimace.
Then he and the sergeant set her arm and put it in splints, she wincing but not whimpering; then we took up the march for home, and that's the end of the tale; and I'm her horse.
Thrushcross Grange is my own, sir,' he interrupted, wincing.
So, by little and little, and not living high, I managed to scrape up the hundred pounds at last,' said Traddles; 'and thank Heaven that's paid - though it was - though it certainly was,' said Traddles, wincing again as if he had had another tooth out, 'a pull.
Indeed," said Gertrude, wincing as all the hard things Trefusis had told her of herself came into her mind at the heels of Erskine's unfortunate allusion to her power of enjoying herself.
asked the page, wincing a little at sight of the blood.
True," replied the marquise, without wincing in the slightest degree at the tragic remembrance thus called up; "but bear in mind, if you please, that our respective parents underwent persecution and proscription from diametrically opposite principles; in proof of which I may remark, that while my family remained among the stanchest adherents of the exiled princes, your father lost no time in joining the new government; and that while the Citizen Noirtier was a Girondin, the Count Noirtier became a senator.
Mordaunt sustained this new attack without wincing.
This somewhat rallied up his spirit and warmed his heart; all the time of the operation, however, he kept his eyes riveted on the wound, with his teeth set, and a whimsical wincing of the countenance, that occasionally gave his nose something of its usual comic curl.
A thin, high Kathiawar mare, with eyes and nostrils aflame, rocketed out of the jam, snorting and wincing as her rider bent her across the road in chase of a shouting man.
He lay back without wincing, though he bit his lip from time to time.
The bent head, the averted eye, the faltering voice, the wincing figure-- these, and not the unshrinking gaze and frank reply, are the true signals of passion.