windborne

wind·borne

or wind-borne  (wĭnd′bôrn′)
adj.
Carried by the wind: windborne ashes.
Translations

windborne

[ˈwɪndbɔːn] ADJllevado por el viento
References in periodicals archive ?
Windborne perform at Hexham Abbey's Great Hall on Saturday at 7.
Allergy UK says that avoiding hay fever is diffi-cult for sufferers because pollen spores are windborne and can travel for miles.
The bride would like to offer a very special thank you to Debbie Rankin, Barbara and David Windborne, Cile Alexander, Natalie Wester, Melanie Morrow, John McCommon, The George's, Maxine Kron, Wanda Williamson, Jill Connor Browne, Bucky Owens, and Daisy A Day Florist.
Hurricane winds and windborne debris can cause catastrophic damage, however wind is just one part of the risk.
Stem rust, which spreads via windborne spores, can quickly turn a healthy crop into a decrepit mess of broken stems and shriveled grains.
But staying indoors when the pollen count is high may not help to evade windborne pollen.
But staying indoors when the pollen count is very high may not help to evade windborne pollen.
Schmallenberg is a windborne virus, but scientists do not yet know what, if any, role animal-to-animal transmission plays in spreading it.
The shelters will be designed and constructed to Category 5 standards to provide protection to more than 500 people each from winds up to 300km/h, windborne debris and storm tide inundation.
It has been very warm and windy these last couple of weeks - ideal conditions to spread windborne pollens.
During the past decade, the FAO estimated that 29 countries in East and North Africa, the Near East, and Central and South Asia--accounting for 37 percent of global wheat production--have been affected or have potentially been at risk of the windborne wheat fungus.
The disease, transmitted on windborne spores, could easily spread to India, Pakistan, the Middle East and North Africa, which together grow about 25% of the world's wheat, causing total annual losses of some $3bn.