windlass


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windlass

wind·lass

 (wĭnd′ləs)
n.
Any of numerous hauling or lifting machines consisting essentially of a horizontal cylinder turned by a crank or a motor so that a line attached to the load is wound around the cylinder.
tr.v. wind·lassed, wind·lass·ing, wind·lass·es
To raise with a windlass.

[Middle English wyndlas, alteration of windas, from Old Norse vindāss : vinda, to wind + āss, pole.]

windlass

(ˈwɪndləs)
n
(Mechanical Engineering) a machine for raising weights by winding a rope or chain upon a barrel or drum driven by a crank, motor, etc
vb
(Mechanical Engineering) (tr) to raise or haul (a weight, etc) by means of a windlass
[C14: from Old Norse vindáss, from vinda to wind2 + ass pole; related to Old French guindas, Middle Low German, Dutch windas]

wind•lass

(ˈwɪnd ləs)

n.
1. a device for hauling or hoisting, commonly having a horizontal drum on which a rope attached to the load is wound; winch.
v.t.
2. to raise, haul, or move (a load) by means of a windlass.
[1350–1400; Middle English wind(e)las < Old Norse vindāss=vinda to wind2 + āss beam]

windlass


Past participle: windlassed
Gerund: windlassing

Imperative
windlass
windlass
Present
I windlass
you windlass
he/she/it windlasses
we windlass
you windlass
they windlass
Preterite
I windlassed
you windlassed
he/she/it windlassed
we windlassed
you windlassed
they windlassed
Present Continuous
I am windlassing
you are windlassing
he/she/it is windlassing
we are windlassing
you are windlassing
they are windlassing
Present Perfect
I have windlassed
you have windlassed
he/she/it has windlassed
we have windlassed
you have windlassed
they have windlassed
Past Continuous
I was windlassing
you were windlassing
he/she/it was windlassing
we were windlassing
you were windlassing
they were windlassing
Past Perfect
I had windlassed
you had windlassed
he/she/it had windlassed
we had windlassed
you had windlassed
they had windlassed
Future
I will windlass
you will windlass
he/she/it will windlass
we will windlass
you will windlass
they will windlass
Future Perfect
I will have windlassed
you will have windlassed
he/she/it will have windlassed
we will have windlassed
you will have windlassed
they will have windlassed
Future Continuous
I will be windlassing
you will be windlassing
he/she/it will be windlassing
we will be windlassing
you will be windlassing
they will be windlassing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been windlassing
you have been windlassing
he/she/it has been windlassing
we have been windlassing
you have been windlassing
they have been windlassing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been windlassing
you will have been windlassing
he/she/it will have been windlassing
we will have been windlassing
you will have been windlassing
they will have been windlassing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been windlassing
you had been windlassing
he/she/it had been windlassing
we had been windlassing
you had been windlassing
they had been windlassing
Conditional
I would windlass
you would windlass
he/she/it would windlass
we would windlass
you would windlass
they would windlass
Past Conditional
I would have windlassed
you would have windlassed
he/she/it would have windlassed
we would have windlassed
you would have windlassed
they would have windlassed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.windlass - lifting device consisting of a horizontal cylinder turned by a crank on which a cable or rope winds
capstan - a windlass rotated in a horizontal plane around a vertical axis; used on ships for weighing anchor or raising heavy sails
lifting device - a device for lifting heavy loads
ship - a vessel that carries passengers or freight
yard donkey, yarder - a winch (or system of winches) powered by an engine and used to haul logs from a stump to a landing or to a skid road
Translations

windlass

[ˈwɪndləs] Ntorno m

windlass

[ˈwɪndləs] n (= winch) → treuil m

windlass

n (= winch)Winde f; (Naut) → Ankerwinde f

windlass

[ˈwɪndləs] nargano, verricello
References in classic literature ?
It was five o'clock in the afternoon of the bright autumnal Sunday, before a candle was sent down to try the air, while three or four rough faces stood crowded close together, attentively watching it: the man at the windlass lowering as they were told.
As the rope went out, tight and strained, and the windlass creaked, there was not a breath among the one or two hundred men and women looking on, that came as it was wont to come.
Maud held the turn on the windlass and coiled down the slack.
The tackle dragged heavily across the rail, increasing its drag as the spar arose more and more out of the water, and the exertion on the windlass grew severe.
And here Bildad, who, with Peleg, be it known, in addition to his other offices, was one of the licensed pilots of the port --he being suspected to have got himself made a pilot in order to save the Nantucket pilot-fee to all the ships he was concerned in, for he never piloted any other craft --Bildad, I say, might now be seen actively engaged in looking over the bows for the approaching anchor, and at intervals singing what seemed a dismal stave of psalmody, to cheer the hands at the windlass, who roared forth some sort of a chorus about the girls in Booble Alley, with hearty good will.
Oh, that," said Penn, proudly, "is a Spanish windlass.
Long Jack and Uncle Salters slipped the windlass-brakes into their sockets, and began to heave up the anchor, the windlass jarring as the wet hempen cable strained on the barrel.
The Russians had a neat log house built on a grassy slope, with a windlass well beside the door.
There he sees the cable ranged, the windlass disconnected, the compressors opened; and there, after giving his own last order, "Stand clear of the cable
There is no windlass nor any trace of there ever having been any--no rope--nothing.
It was an amateur-sculler, well up to his work though taking it easily, in so light a boat that the Rogue remarked: 'A little less on you, and you'd a'most ha' been a Wagerbut'; then went to work at his windlass handles and sluices, to let the sculler in.
When Riderhood had run to his second windlass and turned it, and while he leaned against the lever of that gate to help it to swing open presently, he noticed, lying to rest under the green hedge by the towing-path astern of the Lock, a Bargeman.