windward


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wind·ward

 (wĭnd′wərd)
adj. & adv.
On or toward the side from which the wind is blowing.
n.
The windward side or quarter.
Idiom:
to windward
Into or to an advantageous posture or position.

windward

(ˈwɪndwəd) nautical
adj
(Nautical Terms) of, in, or moving to the quarter from which the wind blows
n
1. (Nautical Terms) the windward point
2. (Nautical Terms) the side towards the wind
3. (Nautical Terms) to windward of advantageously situated with respect to
adv
(Nautical Terms) towards the wind

wind•ward

(ˈwɪnd wərd)

adv.
1. toward the wind; toward the point from which the wind blows.
adj.
2. pertaining to, situated in, or moving toward the quarter from which the wind blows (opposed to leeward).
n.
3. the point or quarter from which the wind blows.
4. the side toward the wind.
Idioms:
to (the) windward, in or into a favorable or secure position.
wind′ward•ness, n.

windward

Side of a boat against which the wind blows.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.windward - the direction from which the wind is coming
direction - the spatial relation between something and the course along which it points or moves; "he checked the direction and velocity of the wind"
to windward, weather side, windward side, weatherboard - the side toward the wind
leeward - the direction in which the wind is blowing
2.windward - the side of something that is toward the wind
side, face - a surface forming part of the outside of an object; "he examined all sides of the crystal"; "dew dripped from the face of the leaf"
lee side, leeward, lee - the side of something that is sheltered from the wind
Adj.1.windward - on the side exposed to the wind; "the windward islands"
leeward - on the side away from the wind; "on the leeward side of the island"
Adv.1.windward - away from the wind; "they were sailing windward"
leeward, upwind - toward the wind; "they were sailing leeward"
Translations

windward

[ˈwɪndwəd]
A. ADJde barlovento
B. Nbarlovento m
to windwarda barlovento

windward

adjWind-, dem Wind zugekehrt; directionzum Wind; windward sidedem Wind zugekehrte Seite, Windseite f
nWindseite f; to steer to windward of an islandauf die Windseite einer Insel zusteuern

windward

[ˈwɪndwəd] (Naut)
1. adj & advsopravvento inv
2. nlato sopravvento
to windward → sopravvento
References in classic literature ?
but as she was so far to windward, and shooting by, apparently making a passage to some other ground, the Pequod could not hope to reach her.
If you would on'y lay your course, and a p'int to windward, you would ride in carriages, you would.
We got the starboard tacks aboard, we cast off our weather-braces and lifts; we set in the lee-braces, and hauled forward by the weather-bowlings, and hauled them tight, and belayed them, and hauled over the mizen tack to windward, and kept her full and by as near as she would lie.
He remembered something like it in the past, a street-lamp crowned and caked upon the windward side with snow, the wind uttering its mournful hoot, himself looking on, even as now; but the cold had struck too sharply on his wits, and memory failed him as to the date and sequel of the reminiscence.
Fifteen days later, two thousand miles farther off, the Helvetia, of the Compagnie-Nationale, and the Shannon, of the Royal Mail Steamship Company, sailing to windward in that portion of the Atlantic lying between the United States and Europe, respectively signalled the monster to each other in 42@ 15' N.
This order was also executed; and the vessel passed, as Dantes had predicted, twenty fathoms to windward.
As soon as they passed the beacons, they began to ply to windward.
In the first place, they dug deep holes in the snow, piling it up in ramparts to windward as a protection against the blast.
P-, in charge of the deck, hooked on to the windward mizzen rigging in a state of perfect serenity; myself, the third mate, also hooked on somewhere to windward of the slanting poop, in a state of the utmost preparedness to jump at the very first hint of some sort of order, but otherwise in a perfectly acquiescent state of mind.
We can't keep her full and bye, sir; watch her ever so close, she will fall off and then, sir, when I put the helm down so gently, and try like to coax her to the work, she won't take it kindly, but will fall round off again; and it's all because she knows the land is under the lee, sir, and she won't go any more to windward.
For days they suffered the doleful rigors and retchings of sea-sickness, lurking below in their berths in squalid state, or emerging now and then like spectres from the hatchways, in capotes and blankets, with dirty nightcaps, grizzly beard, lantern visage and unhappy eye, shivering about the deck, and ever and anon crawling to the sides of the vessel, and offering up their tributes to the windward, to infinite annoyance of the captain.
We've got to hitch to windward of that Mark Boat somehow," George cried.