windy


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Related to windy: rainy

wind·y

 (wĭn′dē)
adj. wind·i·er, wind·i·est
1. Characterized by or abounding in wind: a windy night.
2. Open to the wind; unsheltered: a windy terrace.
3. Resembling the wind in speed, force, or variability: a windy dash homeward.
4.
a. Lacking substance; empty: windy promises.
b. Given to or characterized by wearisome verbosity: a windy speaker.
5. Flatulent.

wind′i·ly adv.
wind′i·ness n.

windy

(ˈwɪndɪ)
adj, windier or windiest
1. (Physical Geography) of, characterized by, resembling, or relating to wind; stormy
2. (Physical Geography) swept by or open to powerful winds
3. (Rhetoric) marked by or given to empty, prolonged, and often boastful speech; bombastic: windy orations.
4. void of substance
5. (Physiology) an informal word for flatulent
6. slang afraid; frightened; nervous
ˈwindily adv
ˈwindiness n

wind•y

(ˈwɪn di)

adj. wind•i•er, wind•i•est.
1. accompanied or characterized by wind: a windy day.
2. exposed to or swept by the wind.
3. unsubstantial; empty: windy promises.
4. characterized by or given to prolonged, empty talk; voluble; bombastic.
5. characterized by or causing flatulence.
[before 900]
wind′i•ly, adv.
wind′i•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.windy - abounding in or exposed to the wind or breezeswindy - abounding in or exposed to the wind or breezes; "blowy weather"; "a windy bluff"
stormy - (especially of weather) affected or characterized by storms or commotion; "a stormy day"; "wide and stormy seas"
2.windy - not practical or realizable; speculative; "airy theories about socioeconomic improvement"; "visionary schemes for getting rich"
utopian - characterized by or aspiring to impracticable perfection; "the dim utopian future"; "utopian idealists"; "recognized the utopian nature of his hopes"
3.windy - resembling the wind in speed, force, or variability; "a windy dash home"
fast - acting or moving or capable of acting or moving quickly; "fast film"; "on the fast track in school"; "set a fast pace"; "a fast car"
4.windy - using or containing too many wordswindy - using or containing too many words; "long-winded (or windy) speakers"; "verbose and ineffective instructional methods"; "newspapers of the day printed long wordy editorials"; "proceedings were delayed by wordy disputes"
prolix - tediously prolonged or tending to speak or write at great length; "editing a prolix manuscript"; "a prolix lecturer telling you more than you want to know"

windy

windy

adjective
1. Exposed to or characterized by the presence of freely circulating air or wind:
2. Filled up with or as if with something insubstantial:
Translations
شَدِيدُ الرِّيَاحعاصِف، كَثير الرّيح
větrný
blæsende
tuulinen
vjetrovit
szeles
hvassviîrasamur, hvass
風の強い
바람이 센
vetroven
blåsigihåligtom
ซึ่งมีลมแรง
rüzgarlırüzgârlı
lộng gió

windy

[ˈwɪndɪ] ADJ (windier (compar) (windiest (superl)))
1. [day] → de mucho viento, ventoso; [place] (= exposed to wind) → expuesto al viento
it's windy todayhoy hace viento
Edinburgh's a very windy cityen Edimburgo hace mucho viento
the Windy CityChicago m CITY NICKNAMES
2. (Brit) (o.f.) (= afraid, nervous) → miedoso, temeroso (about por) to be windypasar miedo
to get windyasustarse

windy

[ˈwɪndi] adj [day, night] → de grand vent; [hill, ridge, terrace] → venteux/euse windy conditionswindy conditions nplgrand vent m
in windy conditions → par grand vent
it's windy → il y a du vent

windy

adj (+er)
day, weather, placewindig
(inf: = verbose) speech, stylelangatmig
(esp Brit inf: = frightened) to be/get windyAngst or Schiss (sl)haben/bekommen

windy

[ˈwɪndɪ] adj (-ier (comp) (-iest (superl)))
a.ventoso/a
it's windy → c'è vento
b. (fam) (old) (afraid, nervous) windy (about)teso/a (per), nervoso/a (per)

wind1

(wind) noun
1. (an) outdoor current of air. The wind is strong today; There wasn't much wind yesterday; Cold winds blow across the desert.
2. breath. Climbing these stairs takes all the wind out of me.
3. air or gas in the stomach or intestines. His stomach pains were due to wind.
verb
to cause to be out of breath. The heavy blow winded him.
adjective
(of a musical instrument) operated or played using air pressure, especially a person's breath.
ˈwindy adjective
a windy hill-top; a windy day; It's windy today.
ˈwindiness noun
ˈwindfall noun
1. an apple etc blown from a tree.
2. any unexpected gain or success.
ˈwindmill noun
a machine with sails that work by wind power, for grinding corn or pumping water.
ˈwindpipe noun
the passage for air between mouth and lungs.
windsurf, windsurfer, windsurfingwindˈwindscreen noun
(American ˈwindshield).
1. a transparent (usually glass) screen above the dashboard of a car.
2. a wall usually constructed out from the house wall to protect people on a patio or balcony from the wind.
ˈwindsock noun
a device for indicating the direction and speed of wind on an airfield.
windsurf (ˈwindsəːf) verb
to move across water while standing on a windsurfer.
ˈwindsurfer noun
1. (also sailboard) a board with a sail for moving across water with the aid of the wind.
2. the person controlling this board.
ˈwindsurfing noun
ˈwindswept adjective
exposed to the wind and showing the effects of it. windswept hair; a windswept landscape.
get the wind up
to become nervous or anxious. She got the wind up when she realized how close we were to the edge.
get wind of
to get a hint of or hear indirectly about.
get one's second wind
to recover one's natural breathing after breathlessness.
in the wind
about to happen. A change of policy is in the wind.
like the wind
very quickly. The horse galloped away like the wind.

windy

شَدِيدُ الرِّيَاح větrný blæsende windig ανεμόδαρτος azotado por el viento, ventoso tuulinen venteux vjetrovit ventoso 風の強い 바람이 센 winderig forblåst wietrzny ventoso ветреный blåsig ซึ่งมีลมแรง rüzgarlı lộng gió 有风的
References in classic literature ?
It would be better for me if I could become excited and wrangle about politics like windy old Tom Wil- lard," he thought, as he left the window and went again along the hallway to the room occupied by his friend, George Willard.
We burrowed down in the straw and curled up close together, watching the angry red die out of the west and the stars begin to shine in the clear, windy sky.
Insufferable in the glare of a Sabbath sun, bleak, windy, and flaring in the gloom of a Sabbath night, and hopelessly depressing on all days of the week, the First Presbyterian Church lifted its blunt steeple from the barrenest area of the flats, and was hideous
To see him striding along the profile of a hill on a windy day, with his clothes bagging and fluttering about him, one might have mistaken him for the genius of famine descending upon the earth, or some scarecrow eloped from a cornfield.
In bony, ribby regions of the earth, where at the base of high broken cliffs masses of rock lie strewn in fantastic groupings upon the plain, you will often discover images as of the petrified forms of the Leviathan partly merged in grass, which of a windy day breaks against them in a surf of green surges.
One cold windy day Dolly had brought Jerry a basin of something hot, and was standing by him while he ate it.
It was a stormy, windy night, such as raises whole squadrons of nondescript noises in rickety old houses.
Gentle breeze, that wanderest unseen, And bendest the thistles round Loira of storms, Traveler of the windy glens, Why hast thou left my ear so soon?
This was good; this would be romantic; two hundred and fifty people grouped on the windy summit, with their hair flying and their red blankets flapping, in the solemn presence of the coming sun, would be a striking and memorable spectacle.
I shall never forget his flying Henry's kite for him that very windy day last Easterand ever since his particular kindness last September twelvemonth in writing that note, at twelve o'clock at night, on purpose to assure me that there was no scarlet fever at Cobham, I have been convinced there could not be a more feeling heart nor a better man in existence.
It was a wet and windy afternoon: Georgiana had fallen asleep on the sofa over the perusal of a novel; Eliza was gone to attend a saint's-day service at the new church--for in matters of religion she was a rigid formalist: no weather ever prevented the punctual discharge of what she considered her devotional duties; fair or foul, she went to church thrice every Sunday, and as often on week- days as there were prayers.
But they were obliged to wait more than a week because first there came some very windy days and then Colin was threatened with a cold, which two things happening one after the other would no doubt have thrown him into a rage but that there was so much careful and mysterious planning to do and almost every day Dickon came in, if only for a few minutes, to talk about what was happening on the moor and in the lanes and hedges and on the borders of streams.