wingspread


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wing·spread

 (wĭng′sprĕd′)
n.
The distance between the tips of the wings of a flying animal, such as a bird or insect, when the wings are fully extended.

wing•spread

(ˈwɪŋˌsprɛd)

n.
the distance between the outermost tips of the wings of a bird, insect, etc., when the wings are extended as far as possible.
[1895–1900]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wingspread - distance between the tips of the wings (as of a bird or insect) when fully extended
distance, length - size of the gap between two places; "the distance from New York to Chicago"; "he determined the length of the shortest line segment joining the two points"
2.wingspread - linear distance between the extremities of an airfoilwingspread - linear distance between the extremities of an airfoil
distance, length - size of the gap between two places; "the distance from New York to Chicago"; "he determined the length of the shortest line segment joining the two points"
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
The Abbey Resort joins Benchmark's other noted Midwestern properties, including Racine, Wisconsin's Wingspread Retreat & Executive Conference Center and Chicago's Eaglewood Resort & Spa.
They use the Wingspread declaration as an informal error to insinuate that precautionary principle's supporters want to forbid any potentially damage producing activity.
The second one comes from 1998 Wingspread Statement on the Precautionary Principle (2) and it states: "When an activity raises threats of harm to human health or the environment, precautionary measures should be taken even if some cause and effect relationships are not fully established scientifically.
The field of endocrine disruption is widely recognized as having formally begun in 1991 with the historic meeting at the Wingspread Conference Center in Racine, Wisconsin.
Peek's deconstructive opus includes several of Don's writings, publications by organization leaders, the workgroup notes from the seminal Wingspread Conference, organization newsletters, and the collected ideas from conference attendees in 2004 and 2014 for next steps in our development.
And in 1993, the Wingspread Group on Higher Education, in its seminal report, An American Imperative: Higher Expectations for Higher Education, actually recommended the solution to reform: "Putting learning at the heart of the academic enterprise will mean overhauling the conceptual, procedural, curricular, and other architecture of postsecondary education on most campuses.
However, Cooper gives serious attention to the argument, made in The New Student Politics: The Wingspread Statement on Civic Engagement (Long, 2001), that students disillusioned with conventional political institutions are not necessarily disengaged but have chosen, through community service, a different sort of political action.
This effort culminated in a 1989 Wingspread conference hosted by the Johnson Foundation at which the "Principles of Good Practice in Combining Service and Learning" were articulated.
Wingspread, described by Wright as "the last of the prairie houses," is now a conference center for The Johnson Foundation.
Sociological views were prominent at the Wingspread Conference and Bitzer and Edwin Black's edited Prospect of Rhetoric (1971), most notably in Hugh Dalziel Duncan's "On the Need to Clarify Social Models of Rhetoric," but elsewhere as well (see Enos & McNabb, 1997; Porrovecchio, 2010).
Precautionary Principle from Wingspread Conference, 1998.
For a group of workstations adjacent to full-height windows, the shape of 13-W CFLs white ceiling-hung luminaires resembles the wingspread of birds in flight.