winkingly


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

winkingly

(ˈwɪŋkɪŋlɪ)
adv
with a wink or winks
References in periodicals archive ?
In a recent column, we singled out the new TV show, 'Stupid Man, Smart Phone,' for its unique and 'earcatching' title, which winkingly entices viewers to watch it.
comes in the form of a winkingly self-serious "Reader's
Simmons, winkingly reprising the hanging-judge hostility of his Oscar-winning performance in "Whiplash"), and Mia hasn't forgiven him for literally giving her the cold shoulder.
Incidentally, there's a satisfying sense of symmetry in the fact that Robert Donat - star of the 1935 Hitchcock thriller which this play winkingly pays homage to - was once a member of the Liverpool Playhouse's repertory company.
The 48-year-old musician, sometime frontman of piano-pop trio Ben Folds Five and perennially experimental solo artist, performed at the Royal Opera House in London this week - a gig he winkingly referred to as his "warm-up" for tonight's al-fresco show at Glasgow's Kelvingrove Bandstand.
Armada is almost pure action-adventure while winkingly employing a barrage of jokes and cliches from video games and sci-fi movies, television and books.
Carmen is thus reduced to a financial statement, a product, a bill of sale, but Gutierrez Najera also winkingly refers to her usefulness in ruining the fortunes of men who are unable to control their desires and their purses.
At 1NTERPHFX next March, readers stopped by our booth to tell me how they laughed over that editorial, or winkingly talked to me about" win-win relationships.
Usher winkingly reminds us that all words are created by people and that language unfailingly reflects the thrilling contradictions of our kind.
This is a narrator, then, who winkingly says of the site of Lottie's hotel that it "may be assumed to stand at the corner of Hay Hill" (29).
Orchestrally, Barry's score is fascinating, fizzingly through-composed, winkingly allusive at times (including Janacek and Wagner, and the first two acts ending with references to the "Auld Lang Syne" with which the opera, in Barry's own car-crashing arrangement, begins), and rich in imaginative touches, such as a duet for wind-machines, a seemingly endlessly prolonged brass trill, and two elegantly choreographed plate-smashing cameos.
Part of the strength of Manning and Young's books is the post-modern self-consciousness they bring to their creations, and the ways they largely avoid being winkingly ironic in spite of that self-consciousness.