wino


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win·o

 (wī′nō)
n. pl. win·os Slang
An indigent wine-drinking alcoholic.

wino

(ˈwaɪnəʊ)
n, pl -os
(Brewing) informal a person who habitually drinks wine as a means of getting drunk

win•o

(ˈwaɪ noʊ)

n., pl. win•os.
a person who is addicted to wine, esp. a derelict.
[1915–20, Amer.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wino - a chronic drinkerwino - a chronic drinker      
alcoholic, alky, boozer, dipsomaniac, lush, souse, soaker - a person who drinks alcohol to excess habitually
imbiber, juicer, toper, drinker - a person who drinks alcoholic beverages (especially to excess)
Translations

wino

[ˈwaɪnəʊ] Nalcohólico/a m/f

wino

[ˈwaɪnəʊ] nalcoolo mf

wino

n (inf)Penner m (inf), → Saufbruder m (inf)
References in periodicals archive ?
A judge barred Wino kur's defense attorneys from mentioning the nature of the allegations that Estrada- Robles faces.
Dem transdisziplinaren Anspruch eines Reallabors folgend, erprobt WiNo neue Wege der Zusammenarbeit zwischen Wissenschaft und Praxis.
The speaker was a small man who had stopped to watch the wino.
While a beard traditionally is meant to lend gravitas, authority, earthiness and a sense of patriarchy, whether it is the traditional religious figures, philosophers of numerous shades, Castro and the Barbudos, Marx and Engles, or even Santa Claus for that matter, the unfortunate reality is that modern society scorns the beard and views one as a scraggly bum, wino or outpatient.
CHARLOTTE Church - voice of an angel, liver of a wino.
The "helpers" who sheltered downed airmen are fondly remembered by Canadian evaders, and their heroism and sacrifices are a matter of record but Thomas adds a very personal dimension to the thousands wino risked their own lives in mending broken wings.
It was a challenge, so I went for it," says Windham, wino regularly visits Detroit-area public schools to introduce black girls to car design.
Huddie's question about whether or not God can love a wino is the only thing that he asks in the whole movie.
While searching for a way to control wino erosion on his Oklahoma farm in 1933, Fred Hoeme observed that road building scarifiers, with their heavy pointed shanks, could rip up large clods capable of stopping wind erosion.
His poetical debut was Wiosna i wino (1919; "Spring and Wine"), followed by Wroble na dachu (1921; "Sparrows on the Roof") and Wielka niedzwiedzica (1923; "The Great She-Bear")--all inspired by carefree juvenile optimism.
My second example is from comedian Richard Pryor, a stand-up monologue that depicts a hilarious conversation between a black wino and a black junkie (1974) and that might in fact be seen as one legacy of Newman's slaver's American vision ("sing about Jesus and drink wine all day").
In the dim light of a cold February morning, a grizzled wino shuffles into the Bowery Discount liquor store muttering, "Thunderchicken, it's good lickin'.