winsome


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win·some

 (wĭn′səm)
adj.
Charming, often in a childlike or naive way.

[Middle English winsum, from Old English wynsum : from wynn, joy; see wen- in Indo-European roots + -sum, characterized by; see -some1.]

win′some·ly adv.
win′some·ness n.
Word History: The win- in winsome comes from the Indo-European root *wen-, meaning "to desire, strive for," and has a number of descendants in the Germanic languages. One was the prehistoric Germanic noun *wini- meaning "friend" (literally, "one who desires or loves" someone else), which became wine in Old English and is preserved in such names as Winfred, "friend of peace," and Edwin, "friend of (family) possessions." A different form of the root with a different suffix became Old English wynn, "pleasure, joy," preserved in winsome. Finally, the verb win itself is from this root; its meaning is an extension of the sense "to strive for," namely, "to strive for with success, be victorious." Outside of the Germanic branch of Indo-European, we see the root, for example, in Latin venus or Venus "love, the goddess of love," and the verb venerāre, "to worship," the source of English venerate.

winsome

(ˈwɪnsəm)
adj
charming; winning; engaging: a winsome smile.
[Old English wynsum, from wynn joy (related to Old High German wunnia, German Wonne) + -sum -some1]
ˈwinsomely adv
ˈwinsomeness n

win•some

(ˈwɪn səm)

adj.
sweetly or innocently charming; winning; engaging: a winsome smile.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English wynsum=wyn joy (see wynn) + -sum -some1]
win′some•ly, adv.
win′some•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.winsome - charming in a childlike or naive way
attractive - pleasing to the eye or mind especially through beauty or charm; "a remarkably attractive young man"; "an attractive personality"; "attractive clothes"; "a book with attractive illustrations"

winsome

winsome

adjective
Translations

winsome

[ˈwɪnsəm] ADJencantador, cautivador

winsome

[ˈwɪnsəm] adj [personality, child, smile, charm] → avenant(e)

winsome

adj child, lassreizend, sympathisch; ways, smilegewinnend, einnehmend

winsome

[ˈwɪnsəm] adjaccattivante
References in classic literature ?
And now you shall listen to the Winsome Waggish Warblers, who have often cheered me in my moments of anguish.
For sleeping man, 'twas hard to choose between such winsome days and such seducing nights.
God give that such may be the case, for of all the winsome and affectionate little fellows I have ever seen, not even excepting mine own dear son, the little Richard was the most to be beloved.
And," we are told, "his songs and his verse were so winsome to hear, that his teachers themselves wrote and learned from his mouth.
It is now two months since our guests left us to the enjoyment of each other's society; and I have had nine weeks' experience of this new phase of conjugal life - two persons living together, as master and mistress of the house, and father and mother of a winsome, merry little child, with the mutual understanding that there is no love, friendship, or sympathy between them.
That glad, happy air, that winsome sky, did at last stroke and caress him; the step-mother world, so long cruel -- forbidding --now threw affectionate arms round his stubborn neck, and did seem to joyously sob over him, as if over one, that however wilful and erring, she could yet find it in her heart to save and to bless.
It was just a little girl's face, very bright and very winsome, and over there we were lonely, and it got to mean a good deal to both of us.
Whatever thrifty, hard-working farmer folk might think of gay, Bohemian Blair Stanley in his absence, in his presence even they liked him, by the grace of some winsome, lovable quality in the soul of him.
Of a truth the phrase hath a fair and winsome grace, and is prettily worded withal.
With many a fanciful conceit, Fair Lady, winsome Poesy Her soul, an offering at thy feet, Presents in sonnets unto thee.
In our little town, which is a sample of many, life is as interesting, as pathetic, as joyous as ever it was; no group of weavers was better to look at or think about than the rivulet of winsome girls that overruns our streets every time the sluice is raised, the comedy of summer evenings and winter firesides is played with the old zest and every window-blind is the curtain of a romance.
I shall never forget the debt I owe you," and, with a most winsome smile that displayed a row of perfect teeth, the girl curtsied to Tarzan, who bade her good night and made his way on deck.