winsomeness


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Related to winsomeness: sunder, wield, throngs

win·some

 (wĭn′səm)
adj.
Charming, often in a childlike or naive way.

[Middle English winsum, from Old English wynsum : from wynn, joy; see wen- in Indo-European roots + -sum, characterized by; see -some1.]

win′some·ly adv.
win′some·ness n.
Word History: The win- in winsome comes from the Indo-European root *wen-, meaning "to desire, strive for," and has a number of descendants in the Germanic languages. One was the prehistoric Germanic noun *wini- meaning "friend" (literally, "one who desires or loves" someone else), which became wine in Old English and is preserved in such names as Winfred, "friend of peace," and Edwin, "friend of (family) possessions." A different form of the root with a different suffix became Old English wynn, "pleasure, joy," preserved in winsome. Finally, the verb win itself is from this root; its meaning is an extension of the sense "to strive for," namely, "to strive for with success, be victorious." Outside of the Germanic branch of Indo-European, we see the root, for example, in Latin venus or Venus "love, the goddess of love," and the verb venerāre, "to worship," the source of English venerate.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.winsomeness - childlike charm or appeal
appealingness, charm, appeal - attractiveness that interests or pleases or stimulates; "his smile was part of his appeal to her"
Translations

winsomeness

[ˈwɪnsəmnɪs] Nencanto m
References in classic literature ?
Be- cause the reporter was rapidly becoming a man something of his man's appeal, combined with the winsomeness of the boy, stirred the heart of the lonely woman.
He suffered an unstable upbringing (later immortalised in his song 1941), yet his early albums exude charm and winsomeness.
She deftly eschews winsomeness to capture the frustrations of her wunderkind, who is painfully aware that she towers above her peers and some of the teachers, who are supposedly shepherding her to brighter academic horizons.
Oscar pictured with a She deftly eschews winsomeness to capture the frustrations of her wunderkind, who is painfully aware that she towers above her peers and some of the teachers, who are supposedly shepherding her to brighter academic horizons.
Oscar winner pictured with a rather She deftly eschews winsomeness to capture the frustrations of her wunderkind, who is painfully aware that she towers above her peers and some of the teachers, who are supposedly shepherding her to brighter academic horizons.
Perhaps that should be the authors' next project, especially if they can achieve the same breadth, depth, readability, winsomeness, and wisdom.
DreamWorks' plush-toy descendant of "The Karate Kid" conveys a winsomeness rarely seen since the Disney heyday of Mickey Mouse and Pinocchio.
Davis's letters are less endearing and more excruciating while, as the film progresses, director Jean-Marc Vallee (Wild, Dallas Buyers Club), turns the winsomeness up to 11, culminating in a scene where Davis and Karen actually build a fort from a sofa.
At any rate, he was not granted tenure, and the next year there was nobody in the broader Christian community who was able to speak with a high degree of learning and some degree of winsomeness and persuasiveness on fundamental matters of faith.
Black accurately sums up (and agrees with) the consensus about the film: "At last my role was acting, with winsomeness subordinated to plot.
Brahmachari in a letter as a ''beloved figure on our quadrangles,'' who had impressed people ''through the winsomeness of his personality, the keenness of his mind, the catholicity of his point of view, and not least through his deeply religious spirit.
This book of essays from a conference at the Lutheran Augustinian Monastery, in Erfurt in September, 2008, forthrightly addresses a foundational ecumenical issue--the role of Mary-and charms the reader with its winsomeness.