witch


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witch

 (wĭch)
n.
1. A person, especially a woman, claiming or popularly believed to possess magical powers and practice sorcery.
2. A believer or follower of Wicca; a Wiccan.
3.
a. Offensive An old woman considered to be ugly or frightening.
b. A woman considered to be spiteful or overbearing.
c. Informal A woman or girl considered to be charming or fascinating.
4. One particularly skilled or competent at one's craft: "A witch of a writer, [she] is capable of developing an intensity that verges on ferocity" (Peter S. Prescott).
v. witched, witch·ing, witch·es
v.tr.
1. To work or cast a spell on; bewitch.
2. To cause, bring, or effect by witchcraft.
v.intr.
To use a divining rod to find underground water or minerals; dowse.

[Middle English wicche, from Old English wicce, witch, and wicca, wizard, sorcerer; see weg- in Indo-European roots.]

witch′er·y (-ə-rē) n.
witch′y adj.

witch

(wɪtʃ)
n
1. (Alternative Belief Systems) historically, in mythology and fiction, a woman believed to practise magic or sorcery, esp black magic
2. (Alternative Belief Systems) a practitioner of a Nature-based religion founded on ancient beliefs, which honours both a male and female divine principle and includes the practice of magic, esp healing magic, and divination
3. informal derogatory an ugly or wicked woman
4. a fascinating or enchanting woman
5. (Alternative Belief Systems) short for water witch
vb
6. (Alternative Belief Systems) (tr) to cause or change by or as if by witchcraft
7. a less common word for bewitch
[Old English wicca; related to Middle Low German wicken to conjure, Swedish vicka to move to and fro]
ˈwitchˌlike adj

witch

(wɪtʃ)
n
(Animals) a flatfish, Pleuronectes (or Glyptocephalus) cynoglossus, of N Atlantic coastal waters, having a narrow greyish-brown body marked with tiny black spots: family Pleuronectidae (plaice, flounders, etc)
[C19: perhaps from witch1, alluding to the appearance of the fish]

witch

(wɪtʃ)

n.
1. a person, now esp. a woman, who professes or is believed to practice magic, esp. black magic; sorceress.
2. an ugly or mean old woman; hag.
3. a person who uses a divining rod; dowser.
v.t.
4. to subject to or bring about by or as if by witchcraft.
5. Archaic. to affect as if by witchcraft; bewitch; charm.
v.i. Compare warlock.
[before 900; Middle English wicche, Old English wicce (feminine); compare Old English wicca (masculine) wizard, akin to wiccian to practice magic, c. Middle Low German wikken]
witch′hood, n.
witch′like`, adj.
witch′y, adj. witch•i•er, witch•i•est.

witch

  • troll - Originally a witch or sorceress.
  • fly-by-night - Said to be an old term of reproach to a woman signifying that she was a witch, and was extended to "anyone who departs hastily from a recent activity," especially while owing money.
  • hag - First meant "witch."
  • witch - In Old English, it was actually wicca and originally (c. 890) was a man who practiced magic or sorcery, who we now call a wizard; by the year 1000, witch came to be defined as "a female magician or sorceress."

witch


Past participle: witched
Gerund: witching

Imperative
witch
witch
Present
I witch
you witch
he/she/it witches
we witch
you witch
they witch
Preterite
I witched
you witched
he/she/it witched
we witched
you witched
they witched
Present Continuous
I am witching
you are witching
he/she/it is witching
we are witching
you are witching
they are witching
Present Perfect
I have witched
you have witched
he/she/it has witched
we have witched
you have witched
they have witched
Past Continuous
I was witching
you were witching
he/she/it was witching
we were witching
you were witching
they were witching
Past Perfect
I had witched
you had witched
he/she/it had witched
we had witched
you had witched
they had witched
Future
I will witch
you will witch
he/she/it will witch
we will witch
you will witch
they will witch
Future Perfect
I will have witched
you will have witched
he/she/it will have witched
we will have witched
you will have witched
they will have witched
Future Continuous
I will be witching
you will be witching
he/she/it will be witching
we will be witching
you will be witching
they will be witching
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been witching
you have been witching
he/she/it has been witching
we have been witching
you have been witching
they have been witching
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been witching
you will have been witching
he/she/it will have been witching
we will have been witching
you will have been witching
they will have been witching
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been witching
you had been witching
he/she/it had been witching
we had been witching
you had been witching
they had been witching
Conditional
I would witch
you would witch
he/she/it would witch
we would witch
you would witch
they would witch
Past Conditional
I would have witched
you would have witched
he/she/it would have witched
we would have witched
you would have witched
they would have witched

witch


click for a larger image
From the Anglo-Saxon wicca, meaning “the wise one;” a person who practices witchcraft.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.witch - a female sorcerer or magician
occultist - a believer in occultism; someone versed in the occult arts
2.witch - a being (usually female) imagined to have special powers derived from the devil
coven - an assembly of witches; usually 13 witches
imaginary being, imaginary creature - a creature of the imagination; a person that exists only in legends or myths or fiction
pythoness - a witch with powers of divination
warlock - a male witch or demon
3.witch - a believer in Wicca
pagan - a person who follows a polytheistic or pre-Christian religion (not a Christian or Muslim or Jew)
4.witch - an ugly evil-looking old womanwitch - an ugly evil-looking old woman  
old woman - a woman who is old
Verb1.witch - cast a spell over someone or somethingwitch - cast a spell over someone or something; put a hex on someone or something
voodoo - bewitch by or as if by a voodoo
spell - place under a spell
becharm, charm - control by magic spells, as by practicing witchcraft

witch

noun enchantress, magician, hag, crone, occultist, sorceress, Wiccan, necromancer am evil witch who had cast a spell on the prince
Quotations
"witch: (1) An ugly and repulsive old woman, in a wicked league with the devil. (2) A beautiful and attractive young woman, in wickedness a league beyond the devil" [Ambrose Bierce The Devil's Dictionary]

witch

noun
1. A woman who practices magic:
2. An ugly, frightening old woman:
Slang: biddy.
Archaic: trot.
3. Informal. A usually unscrupulous woman who seduces or exploits men:
Informal: vamp.
verb
To act upon with or as if with magic:
Translations
سَاحِرَةساحِرَه
čarodějnice
heks
HexeHundszungeRotzunge
noita
vještica
boszorkány
galdranorn
魔女
마녀
ragana
ragana
čarodejnica
čarovnica
häxa
แม่มด
cadıbüyücü kadın
mụ phù thủy

witch

[wɪtʃ]
A. Nbruja f
B. CPD witch doctor Nhechicero m
witch hazel Nolmo m escocés
witch hunt Ncaza f de brujas

witch

[ˈwɪtʃ] nsorcière f

witch

n (lit, fig)Hexe f

witch

:
witchcraft
nHexerei f, → Zauberei f; a book on witchein Buch über (die) Hexenkunst
witch doctor
nMedizinmann m

witch

[wɪtʃ] nstrega

witch

(witʃ) noun
a woman who is supposed to have powers of magic, usually through working with the devil.
ˈwitchcraft noun
magic practised by a witch etc.
ˈwitch-doctor noun
in some African tribes, a person whose profession is to cure illness and keep away evil magical influences.

witch

سَاحِرَة čarodějnice heks Hexe μάγισσα bruja, brujo noita sorcière vještica strega 魔女 마녀 heks heks czarodziejka bruxa ведьма häxa แม่มด cadı mụ phù thủy 巫婆
References in classic literature ?
We are so grateful to you for having killed the Wicked Witch of the East, and for setting our people free from bondage.
What could the little woman possibly mean by calling her a sorceress, and saying she had killed the Wicked Witch of the East?
The witch lies hard and dies hard," said the king carelessly, and turned upon his heel.
The Frenchman had given these small-clothes to an Indian powwow, who parted with them to the old witch for a gill of strong waters, at one of their dances in the forest.
I've made many a puppet since I've been a witch, but methinks this is the finest of them all.
But the old woman was a witch, and she said to the girl, 'There comes one out of the wood who has a wonderful treasure in his body which we must manage to possess ourselves of, darling daughter; we have more right to it than he.
Then the old witch said, 'Now we must have the bird-heart; he will not feel when it is gone.
A BROOMSTICK which had long served a witch as a steed complained of the nature of its employment, which it thought degrading.
Very well," said the Witch, "I will give you work in which you will be associated with intellect - you will come in contact with brains.
Yes, the lady of Sir William Phips was accused of being a witch and of flying through the air to attend witch-meetings.
When darkness came on, he saw a light, which he went up to, and came to a house wherein lived a witch.
I see trouble ahead for all of us," muttered the old witch, after glancing into a magic mirror she carried in her pocket.