with young


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young

 (yŭng)
adj. young·er, young·est
1. Being in an early period of life, development, or growth.
2. Newly begun or formed; not advanced: a young biotech company.
3. Relating to, typical of, or suggestive of youth or early life: He is young for his age.
4. Lacking experience; immature: a young hand at plowing.
5. Being the junior of two people having the same name.
6. Geology Being of an early stage in a geologic cycle. Used of bodies of water and land formations.
n.
1. Young persons considered as a group; youth: entertainment for the young.
2. Offspring; brood: a lioness with her young.
Idiom:
with young
Pregnant. Used of an animal.

[Middle English yong, from Old English geong; see yeu- in Indo-European roots.]

young′ness n.
Synonyms: young, youthful, adolescent, immature, juvenile, childish, puerile, infantile
These adjectives relate to an early stage of growth or development and to its accompanying characteristics. Young is the most general, applying to various periods of life, generally before middle age, as well as to inanimate entities: a young child; a young couple; a young galaxy.
It can suggest a youthful attitude or outlook regardless of chronological age: young at heart.
Youthful suggests the positive characteristics, such as enthusiasm, freshness, or energy, that are traditionally associated with youth: approached the task with youthful ardor.
Adolescent connotes the physical and especially mental or emotional characteristics of those between childhood and maturity; it is generally not disparaging except when used of an adult: adolescent insecurity; an adolescent outburst from the trial lawyer.
Immature is more clearly judgmental, implying that someone falls short of an expected level of mental or emotional development for his or her age: an emotionally immature adult.
Juvenile suggests the immaturity usually associated with adolescents, but it can convey an attitude of tolerance as well as criticism: the juvenile pranks of the conventioneers.
Childish is similar to juvenile but with a younger frame of reference, often suggesting selfishness, stubbornness, or lack of restraint: a committee member with a childish need to have the last word.
However, it can also suggest such positive qualities of children as innocence and wholeheartedness: took childish delight in tending his garden.
Puerile and infantile are used derogatorily to suggest extreme immaturity, especially with regard to social manners: a puerile joke; an infantile boast.
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
You know, it's important to work with young gay people and make sure that they have all the resources that they need to do their work.
Parents, teachers and health care providers regularly miss opportunities to talk with young men about sexual health concerns and fail to provide them with the knowledge and skills they need to protect themselves.
Lynne McKechnie (2000) notes that the conventional methods used in public library user research--interviews and surveys--are not appropriate for use with young children whose oral and written language skills are still developing.