withdraw


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with·draw

 (wĭth-drô′, wĭth-)
v. with·drew (-dro͞o′), with·drawn (-drôn′), with·draw·ing, with·draws
v.tr.
1.
a. To take back or away; remove: withdrew his hand from the cookie jar.
b. To cause to leave or return: The government withdrew its diplomats from the capital.
c. To remove (money) from an account.
d. To turn away (one's gaze, for example).
e. To draw aside: withdrew the curtain.
2.
a. To remove from consideration or participation: withdrew her application; withdrew his son from the race.
b. To recall or retract: withdrew the accusation.
v.intr.
1.
a. To move or draw back; retire: The lawyers withdrew to the judge's chambers.
b. To leave or return, as from a military position.
2.
a. To remove oneself from active participation: withdrew from the competition.
b. To become detached from social or emotional involvement: After the snubbing, he withdrew into a shell.
3. To recall or remove a motion from consideration in parliamentary procedure.
4.
a. To discontinue the use of an addictive substance.
b. To adjust physiologically and mentally to this discontinuation.

[Middle English withdrawen : with, away from; see with + drawen, to pull; see draw.]

with·draw′a·ble adj.
with·draw′er n.

withdraw

(wɪðˈdrɔː)
vb, -draws, -drawing, -drew or -drawn
1. (tr) to take or draw back or away; remove
2. (Banking & Finance) (tr) to remove from deposit or investment in a bank, building society, etc
3. (tr) to retract or recall (a statement, promise, etc)
4. (intr) to retire or retreat: the troops withdrew.
5. (often foll by: from) to back out (of) or depart (from): he withdrew from public life.
6. (Psychology) (intr) to detach oneself socially, emotionally, or mentally
[C13: from with (in the sense: away from) + draw]
withˈdrawable adj
withˈdrawer n

with•draw

(wɪðˈdrɔ, wɪθ-)

v. -drew, -drawn, -draw•ing. v.t.
1. to draw back, away, or aside; take or pull back: to withdraw one's support; She withdrew her hand.
2. to take out or away, as from a place or from consideration or circulation; remove: to withdraw a product from the market.
3. to remove (money) from deposit.
4. to retract or recall: to withdraw an untrue charge.
5. to cause (a person) to undergo withdrawal from addiction to a substance.
v.i.
6. to go or move back, away, or aside; retire; retreat: to withdraw from the room.
7. to remove oneself from some activity, competition, etc.: He withdrew before I could nominate him.
8. to cease using or consuming an addictive narcotic (fol. by from): to withdraw from heroin.
9. (in parliamentary procedure) to remove a motion, amendment, etc., from consideration.
[1175–1225]
with•draw′a•ble, adj.

withdraw

  • anchorite - Its meaning of "hermit" derived from Greek ana-, "back," and chorein, "to withdraw."
  • cease, cede - Cease and cede come from Latin cedere, "go away, withdraw."
  • retire - From French retirer, from re-, "back" and tirer, "throw," its first sense was "withdraw to a place of safety or seclusion."
  • take for the kitchen - To withdraw from a conversation or to remain silent.

withdraw


Past participle: withdrawn
Gerund: withdrawing

Imperative
withdraw
withdraw
Present
I withdraw
you withdraw
he/she/it withdraws
we withdraw
you withdraw
they withdraw
Preterite
I withdrew
you withdrew
he/she/it withdrew
we withdrew
you withdrew
they withdrew
Present Continuous
I am withdrawing
you are withdrawing
he/she/it is withdrawing
we are withdrawing
you are withdrawing
they are withdrawing
Present Perfect
I have withdrawn
you have withdrawn
he/she/it has withdrawn
we have withdrawn
you have withdrawn
they have withdrawn
Past Continuous
I was withdrawing
you were withdrawing
he/she/it was withdrawing
we were withdrawing
you were withdrawing
they were withdrawing
Past Perfect
I had withdrawn
you had withdrawn
he/she/it had withdrawn
we had withdrawn
you had withdrawn
they had withdrawn
Future
I will withdraw
you will withdraw
he/she/it will withdraw
we will withdraw
you will withdraw
they will withdraw
Future Perfect
I will have withdrawn
you will have withdrawn
he/she/it will have withdrawn
we will have withdrawn
you will have withdrawn
they will have withdrawn
Future Continuous
I will be withdrawing
you will be withdrawing
he/she/it will be withdrawing
we will be withdrawing
you will be withdrawing
they will be withdrawing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been withdrawing
you have been withdrawing
he/she/it has been withdrawing
we have been withdrawing
you have been withdrawing
they have been withdrawing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been withdrawing
you will have been withdrawing
he/she/it will have been withdrawing
we will have been withdrawing
you will have been withdrawing
they will have been withdrawing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been withdrawing
you had been withdrawing
he/she/it had been withdrawing
we had been withdrawing
you had been withdrawing
they had been withdrawing
Conditional
I would withdraw
you would withdraw
he/she/it would withdraw
we would withdraw
you would withdraw
they would withdraw
Past Conditional
I would have withdrawn
you would have withdrawn
he/she/it would have withdrawn
we would have withdrawn
you would have withdrawn
they would have withdrawn
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.withdraw - pull back or move away or backward; "The enemy withdrew"; "The limo pulled away from the curb"
back away, crawfish, crawfish out, pull in one's horns, back out, retreat, pull back, withdraw - make a retreat from an earlier commitment or activity; "We'll have to crawfish out from meeting with him"; "He backed out of his earlier promise"; "The aggressive investment company pulled in its horns"
go, locomote, move, travel - change location; move, travel, or proceed, also metaphorically; "How fast does your new car go?"; "We travelled from Rome to Naples by bus"; "The policemen went from door to door looking for the suspect"; "The soldiers moved towards the city in an attempt to take it before night fell"; "news travelled fast"
fall back - move back and away from; "The enemy fell back"
retreat, retrograde - move back; "The glacier retrogrades"
back down, back off, back up - move backwards from a certain position; "The bully had to back down"
2.withdraw - withdraw from active participation; "He retired from chess"
retire, withdraw - lose interest; "he retired from life when his wife died"
bow out, withdraw - retire gracefully; "He bowed out when he realized he could no longer handle the demands of the chairmanship"
drop out - withdraw from established society, especially because of disillusion with conventional values; "She hasn't heard from her brother in years--he dropped out after moving to California"
cease, discontinue, lay off, quit, stop, give up - put an end to a state or an activity; "Quit teasing your little brother"
3.withdraw - release from something that holds fast, connects, or entangles; "I want to disengage myself from his influence"; "disengage the gears"
let go, let go of, release, relinquish - release, as from one's grip; "Let go of the door handle, please!"; "relinquish your grip on the rope--you won't fall"
unlock - set free or release
4.withdraw - cause to be returned; "recall the defective auto tires"; "The manufacturer tried to call back the spoilt yoghurt"
take - take into one's possession; "We are taking an orphan from Romania"; "I'll take three salmon steaks"
decommission - withdraw from active service; "The warship was decommissioned in 1998"
5.withdraw - take back what one has saidwithdraw - take back what one has said; "He swallowed his words"
repudiate, disown, renounce - cast off; "She renounced her husband"; "The parents repudiated their son"
6.withdraw - keep away from others; "He sequestered himself in his study to write a book"
isolate, insulate - place or set apart; "They isolated the political prisoners from the other inmates"
adjourn, retire, withdraw - break from a meeting or gathering; "We adjourned for lunch"; "The men retired to the library"
7.withdraw - break from a meeting or gatheringwithdraw - break from a meeting or gathering; "We adjourned for lunch"; "The men retired to the library"
seclude, sequestrate, sequester, withdraw - keep away from others; "He sequestered himself in his study to write a book"
close down, close up, shut down, close, fold - cease to operate or cause to cease operating; "The owners decided to move and to close the factory"; "My business closes every night at 8 P.M."; "close up the shop"
prorogue - adjourn by royal prerogative; without dissolving the legislative body
8.withdraw - retire gracefully; "He bowed out when he realized he could no longer handle the demands of the chairmanship"
retire - go into retirement; stop performing one's work or withdraw from one's position; "He retired at age 68"
retire, withdraw - withdraw from active participation; "He retired from chess"
9.withdraw - remove (a commodity) from (a supply source)withdraw - remove (a commodity) from (a supply source); "She drew $2,000 from the account"; "The doctors drew medical supplies from the hospital's emergency bank"
remove, take away, withdraw, take - remove something concrete, as by lifting, pushing, or taking off, or remove something abstract; "remove a threat"; "remove a wrapper"; "Remove the dirty dishes from the table"; "take the gun from your pocket"; "This machine withdraws heat from the environment"
draw, take out - take liquid out of a container or well; "She drew water from the barrel"
cheque, check out - withdraw money by writing a check
dip - take a small amount from; "I had to dip into my savings to buy him this present"
hive off, divert - withdraw (money) and move into a different location, often secretly and with dishonest intentions
overdraw - draw more money from than is available; "She overdrew her account"
tap - draw from or dip into to get something; "tap one's memory"; "tap a source of money"
disinvest, divest - reduce or dispose of; cease to hold (an investment); "The company decided to divest"; "the board of trustees divested $20 million in real estate property"; "There was pressure on the university to disinvest in South Africa"
deposit, bank - put into a bank account; "She deposits her paycheck every month"
10.withdraw - lose interest; "he retired from life when his wife died"
fatigue, jade, tire, weary, pall - lose interest or become bored with something or somebody; "I'm so tired of your mother and her complaints about my food"
retire, withdraw - withdraw from active participation; "He retired from chess"
bow out, chicken out, back down, back off, pull out - remove oneself from an obligation; "He bowed out when he heard how much work was involved"
11.withdraw - make a retreat from an earlier commitment or activity; "We'll have to crawfish out from meeting with him"; "He backed out of his earlier promise"; "The aggressive investment company pulled in its horns"
draw back, move back, pull away, pull back, recede, retreat, withdraw, retire - pull back or move away or backward; "The enemy withdrew"; "The limo pulled away from the curb"
12.withdraw - remove something concrete, as by lifting, pushing, or taking off, or remove something abstract; "remove a threat"; "remove a wrapper"; "Remove the dirty dishes from the table"; "take the gun from your pocket"; "This machine withdraws heat from the environment"
depilate, epilate - remove body hair; "epilate her legs"
harvest - remove from a culture or a living or dead body, as for the purposes of transplantation; "The Chinese are said to harvest organs from executed criminals"
tip - remove the tip from; "tip artichokes"
stem - remove the stem from; "for automatic natural language processing, the words must be stemmed"
extirpate - surgically remove (an organ)
enucleate - remove (a tumor or eye) from an enveloping sac or cover
exenterate - remove the contents of (an organ)
enucleate - remove the nucleus from (a cell)
decorticate - remove the cortex of (an organ)
bail - remove (water) from a vessel with a container
undress, disinvest, divest, strip - remove (someone's or one's own) clothes; "The nurse quickly undressed the accident victim"; "She divested herself of her outdoor clothes"; "He disinvested himself of his garments"
ablate - remove an organ or bodily structure
clean, pick - remove unwanted substances from, such as feathers or pits; "Clean the turkey"
clean - remove shells or husks from; "clean grain before milling it"
winnow - blow away or off with a current of air; "winnow chaff"
pick - remove in small bits; "pick meat from a bone"
clear up, clear - free (the throat) by making a rasping sound; "Clear the throat"
muck - remove muck, clear away muck, as in a mine
lift - remove from a surface; "the detective carefully lifted some fingerprints from the table"
lift - take off or away by decreasing; "lift the pressure"
lift - remove from a seedbed or from a nursery; "lift the tulip bulbs"
tear away, tear off - rip off violently and forcefully; "The passing bus tore off her side mirror"
take off - take away or remove; "Take that weight off me!"
take away, take out - take out or remove; "take out the chicken after adding the vegetables"
stone, pit - remove the pits from; "pit plums and cherries"
seed - remove the seeds from; "seed grapes"
unhinge - remove the hinges from; "unhinge the door"
shuck - remove the shucks from; "shuck corn"
hull - remove the hulls from; "hull the berries"
crumb - remove crumbs from; "crumb the table"
chip away, chip away at - remove or withdraw gradually: "These new customs are chipping away at the quality of life"
burl - remove the burls from cloth
knock out - destroy or break forcefully; "The windows were knocked out"
scavenge, clean - remove unwanted substances from
hypophysectomise, hypophysectomize - remove the pituitary glands
degas - remove gas from
husk, shell - remove the husks from; "husk corn"
bur, burr - remove the burrs from
clear away, clear off - remove from sight
flick - remove with a flick (of the hand)
dismantle, strip - take off or remove; "strip a wall of its wallpaper"
strip - remove a constituent from a liquid
clear - remove; "clear the leaves from the lawn"; "Clear snow from the road"
defang - remove the fangs from; "defang the poisonous snake"
debone, bone - remove the bones from; "bone the turkey before roasting it"
disembowel, eviscerate, draw - remove the entrails of; "draw a chicken"
shell - remove from its shell or outer covering; "shell the legumes"; "shell mussels"
shuck - remove from the shell; "shuck oysters"
detusk, tusk - remove the tusks of animals; "tusk an elephant"
dehorn - prevent the growth of horns of certain animals
scalp - remove the scalp of; "The enemies were scalped"
weed - clear of weeds; "weed the garden"
condense - remove water from; "condense the milk"
bale out, bail out - remove (water) from a boat by dipping and throwing over the side
leach, strip - remove substances from by a percolating liquid; "leach the soil"
decalcify - remove calcium or lime from; "decalcify the rock"
detoxicate, detoxify - remove poison from; "detoxify the soil"
de-ionate - remove ions from; "ionate thyroxine"
de-iodinate - remove iodine from; "de-iodinate the thyroxine"
decarbonise, decarbonize, decarburise, decarburize, decoke - remove carbon from (an engine)

withdraw

verb
1. remove, pull, take off, pull out, extract, take away, pull back, draw out, draw back Cassandra withdrew her hand from Roger's. He reached into his pocket and withdrew a piece of paper.
2. take out, extract, draw out They withdrew 100 dollars from their bank account.
3. retreat, go, leave (informal), retire, depart, pull out of, fall back, pull back, back out, back off, cop out (slang), disengage from Troops withdrew from the country last March.
retreat go on, advance, progress, proceed, persist, move forward, press on, forge ahead
4. go, leave, retire, retreat, depart, make yourself scarce, absent yourself The waiter poured the wine and then withdrew.
5. pull out, leave, drop out, secede, disengage, detach yourself, absent yourself The African National Congress threatened to withdraw from the talks.
6. retract, recall, take back, revoke, rescind, disavow, recant, disclaim, abjure, unsay He withdrew his remarks and said he had not intended to cause offence.

withdraw

verb
1. To move (something) from a position occupied:
2. To pull back in:
3. To move or proceed away from a place:
Slang: blow, split, take off.
4. To move back in the face of enemy attack or after a defeat:
5. To remove from association with:
6. To disavow (something previously written or said) irrevocably and usually formally:
Translations
تراجعسحبيَسْحَبُيَسْحَب أقْوالَهيَسْحَب مالا من البَنْك
stáhnoutvyjmout
hævetrække sig tilbage
nostaaperuavetää esiin
izvaditi
draga til bakatakataka til baka/aftur
後退する抜き取る退却する
...을 빼다
atitraukimasatsiėmimasišėmimas
atkāptiesatsauktatvilktizņemtizstāties
dvignitiodstopitiumakniti se
dra (sig) tillbaka
นำออกมา
rút

withdraw

[wɪθˈdrɔː] (withdrew (pt) (withdrawn (pp)))
A. VT
1. (= take out) [+ money] → retirar, sacar (from de)
2. (= recall) [+ troops, ambassador, team] → retirar (from de) [+ product, advertisement, banknotes] → retirar (from de)
3. (= cancel) [+ application, permission, support, licence] → retirar
to withdraw one's labourponerse en huelga
4. (= retract) [+ words, remark] → retractarse de, retirar; [+ charge] → retirar
to withdraw one's hand (from sth/sb)apartar la mano (de algo/algn)
B. VI
1. (= move away) → apartarse, alejarse
2. (= leave room) → retirarse
3. (= move back, retreat) [troops, forces, police] → retirarse (from de) to withdraw to a new positionretirarse a una nueva posición
4. (= pull out) (from deal, game, talks) → retirarse (from de)
5. (= withdraw application, candidacy) → retirarse (from de) to withdraw in favour of sbretirarse en favor de algn
6. (during lovemaking) → dar marcha atrás
7. (Psych) to withdraw into o.sretraerse, encerrarse en sí mismo

withdraw

[wɪðˈdrɔː] [withdrew] [wɪðˈdruː] (pt) [withdrawn] (pp)
vt
(MILITARY) (= pull out) [+ troops] → retirer
(= take out) [+ money] → retirer
He withdrew £750 from his account → Il retira 750 livres de son compte.
(= take back) [+ offer, support, permission] → retirer; [+ service] → interrompre; [+ goods, product] → retirer
to withdraw sth from sale → retirer qch de la vente
(= remove) → retirer
She withdrew the key from the door → Elle retira la clé de la porte.
(= retract) [+ statement, remark] → retirer
vi
(= stop taking part) → se retirer
to withdraw from sth [+ talks, competition, tournament] → se retirer de qch
The Party threatened to withdraw from the talks → Le parti a menacé de se retirer des négociations.
(MILITARY) (= pull out) [army, troops] → se retirer
to withdraw from sth [+ country, region] → se retirer de qch
(= move away) → se retirer
He withdrew to his room → Il se retira dans sa chambre.
(PSYCHOLOGY, PSYCHIATRY) to withdraw into o.s. → se replier sur soi-même

withdraw

pret <withdrew>, ptp <withdrawn>
vt object, motion, charge, offerzurückziehen; troops, team alsoabziehen; ambassadorzurückrufen or -beordern; coins, stampseinziehen, aus dem Verkehr ziehen; (from bank) moneyabheben; words, commentzurücknehmen, widerrufen; privilegesentziehen; the workers withdrew their labour (Brit) or labor (US) → die Arbeiter haben ihre Arbeit niedergelegt; she withdrew her hand from hissie entzog ihm ihre Hand
visich zurückziehen; (Sport also) → zurücktreten (from von), nicht antreten (from von/bei); (= move away)zurücktreten or -gehen; to withdraw in favour (Brit) or favor (US) of somebody elsezugunsten or zu Gunsten eines anderen zurücktreten; to withdraw into oneselfsich in sich (acc)selber zurückziehen; to withdraw to one’s roomsich in sein Zimmer zurückziehen; you can’t withdraw now (from agreement) → du kannst jetzt nicht zurücktreten or abspringen (inf)

withdraw

[wɪθˈdrɔː] (withdrew (pt) (withdrawn (pp)))
1. vt to withdraw (from) (gen) → ritirare (da); (money from bank) → prelevare (da)
he withdrew his remarks → ha ritirato quanto aveva detto
2. vi to withdraw from (gen) → ritirarsi da; (move away) → allontanarsi da
to withdraw in sb's favour → ritirarsi a favore di qn
to withdraw to a new position (Mil) → arretrare su una nuova posizione
to withdraw into o.s. → chiudersi in se stesso/a

withdraw

(wiðˈdroː) past tense withˈdrew (-ˈdruː) : past participle withˈdrawn verb
1. to (cause to) move back or away. The army withdrew from its position; He withdrew his troops; They withdrew from the competition.
2. to take back (something one has said). She withdrew her remarks, and apologized; He later withdrew the charges he'd made against her.
3. to remove (money from a bank account etc). I withdrew all my savings and went abroad.
withˈdrawal noun
withˈdrawn adjective
(of a person) not responsive or friendly.

withdraw

يَسْحَبُ vyjmout trække sig tilbage zurückziehen αποσύρω retirar vetää esiin retirer izvaditi ritirare 抜き取る ...을 빼다 terugtrekken ta bort cofnąć retirar отводить dra (sig) tillbaka นำออกมา çekmek rút 收回

withdraw

vi. retirar, suprimir, descontinuar; privar de;
to ___ a product from the marketdescontinuar o suprimir un producto.
References in classic literature ?
Oh no, please don't, I'd rather not," she said, trying to withdraw her hand, and looking frightened in spite of her denial.
And he bent and pressed his lips upon her hand as if he wished never more to withdraw them.
Monsieur de Montcalm pledges his word for our safety, and I have ordered the men to withdraw a little, in order to prove how much we depend on his assurance.
They tried to withdraw the charge, but he'd been committed.
Whether this answer affected their courage, or not, I cannot tell; but, contrary to our expectations, they formed a scheme to deceive us, declaring it was their orders, from Governor Hamilton, to take us captives, and not to destroy us; but if nine of us would come out, and treat with them, they would immediatly withdraw their forces from our walls, and return home peaceably.
This contemptuous tranquillity on the part of an occupant of the house, in response to the butcher's indefatigable efforts to attract notice, so piqued the man of flesh that he determined to withdraw.
Unknown to all but Hester Prynne, and possessing the lock and key of her silence, he chose to withdraw his name from the roll of mankind, and, as regarded his former ties and interest, to vanish out of life as completely as if he indeed lay at the bottom of the ocean, whither rumour had long ago consigned him.
Every few moments, when the man spoke, or moved, or smiled, he would start and fix his eyes on him, and then suddenly withdraw them, as the bright, dark eyes met his with such unconcerned coolness.
I do not hesitate to say, that those who call themselves Abolitionists should at once effectually withdraw their support, both in person and property, from the government of Massachusetts, and not wait till they constitute a majority of one, before they suffer the right to prevail through them.
He was loath to withdraw his faith from the twins, and was resolved not to do it on the present indecisive evidence; but--well, he would think, and then decide how to act.
He little imagined how my heart warmed towards him when I beheld his black eyes withdraw so suspiciously under their brows, as I rode up, and when his fingers sheltered themselves, with a jealous resolution, still further in his waistcoat, as I announced my name.
These better tidings encouraged Miss Garth to withdraw to her own room, and to take the rest which she needed sorely.