woad


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woad

 (wōd)
n.
1. An annual Eurasian plant (Isatis tinctoria) in the mustard family, formerly cultivated for its leaves that yield a blue dye.
2. The dye obtained from this plant.

[Middle English wode, from Old English wād.]

woad

(wəʊd)
n
1. (Plants) a European plant, Isatis tinctoria, formerly cultivated for its leaves, which yield a blue dye: family Brassicaceae (crucifers). See also dyer's-weed, dyer's rocket
2. (Dyeing) the dye obtained from this plant, used esp by the ancient Britons, as a body dye
[Old English wād; related to Old High German weit; Middle Dutch wēd, Latin vitrum]

woad

(woʊd)

n.
1. any Old World plant of the genus Isatis, of the mustard family, esp. I. tinctoria, formerly cultivated for a blue dye extracted from its leaves.
2. this dye.
[before 1000; Middle English wode, Old English wād, c. Old High German weit; akin to French guède, Medieval Latin waizda < Germanic]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.woad - a blue dyestuff obtained from the woad plant
dye, dyestuff - a usually soluble substance for staining or coloring e.g. fabrics or hair
2.woad - any of several herbs of the genus Isatis
genus Isatis, Isatis - Old World genus of annual to perennial herbs: woad
dyer's woad, Isatis tinctoria - European biennial formerly grown for the blue coloring matter yielded by its leaves
herb, herbaceous plant - a plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests
Translations
vaid

woad

[wəʊd] Nhierba f pastel, glasto m

woad

n (= dye)Waid m; (= plant)(Färber)waid m
References in classic literature ?
For the few miles of country road that I persuaded our people to make, another would succeed in constructing a canal or a highway; and for my encouragement of the peasants' trade in hats, a minister would emancipate France from the industrial yoke of the foreigner by encouraging the manufacture of clocks in different places, by helping to bring to perfection our iron and steel, our tools and appliances, or by bringing silk or dyer's woad into cultivation.
Incidentally, woad also has a long history in ancient Britain, where notably Boudicca and the Iceni tribe used woad to paint their faces before going into battle.
Throughout the Middle Ages, indigo remained a rare commodity in Europe, fostering the development of the woad dyeing industry.
rst of its name the Old English for woad and the second part a variation on the spelling of the word for hill or mound.
The meadows nearby were a source of woad, needed for making the blue dye, indigo.
The LOS Angeles Dodgers won the Woad Series 4-1 over the Oakland A's.
One of the oldest blue dyes has been used for more than 6,000 years and comes from a plant called Woad.
Drugstores were running short of banlangen, a traditional Chinese medicine for colds made from the roots of the woad plant, used as a blue dye from ancient times.
gum as she waits for the shuttle, on the woad couple talking loudly and
That pinkness is nicely set off by the blue shutters of thw windows - they have to be blue by law and not just any blue, a blue from woad, the plant which the Ancient Brits used to daub themselves with but used here since the Middle Ages as a dye but also in soaps, paints and for art products and in fashion.
BIG MONEY From left, the Murdochs, the Normans and Madonna and Guy FIERY With girlfriend Oksana before their bitter break-up WOAD AND WOE Gibson in Braveheart, far left, and in his police mugshot LOYAL Robyn, pictured in happier times with Gibson, stood by him in his court battles.
I find it amazing that while your average Ancient Briton was swanning around smeared in woad and living in mud huts, Egyptians were creating these colossal structures.