woe


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woe

 (wō)
n.
1. Sorrow or grief; misery. See Synonyms at regret.
2.
a. Misfortune or wretchedness: listened to his tale of woe.
b. A cause of sorrow or misery; a misfortune: economic and political woes.
interj.
Used to express sorrow or dismay.
Idioms:
woe betide (someone)
1. Used to express the wish for someone to experience misfortune.
2. Used as a warning or allusion to negative consequences: "Even though my dad was no farmer, he was a crack shot and a very good hunter&.... woe betide the unwary moose that wandered down from Canada" (Howard Frank Mosher).
woe is me
Used to lament one's situation or fate.
woe to (someone)
1. Used to express the wish for someone to experience misfortune.
2. Used as a warning or allusion to negative consequences: "Our sun will be a red giant, and woe to any earthlings who may be around to witness its bloated blush, for the planet on which they stand will likely be vaporized in the expansion" (Natalie Angier).

[Middle English wa, wo, from Old English , woe!]

woe

(wəʊ)
n
1. literary intense grief or misery
2. (often plural) affliction or misfortune
3. woe betide someone misfortune will befall someone: woe betide you if you arrive late.
interj
archaic Also: woe is me an exclamation of sorrow or distress
[Old English wā, wǣ; related to Old Saxon, Old High German wē, Old Norse vei, Gothic wai, Latin vae, Sanskrit uvē; see wail]

woe

(woʊ)

n.
1. grievous distress, affliction, or trouble.
2. an affliction: She suffered a fall, among her other woes.
interj.
3. (used to express grief, distress, or lamentation.)
[before 900; Middle English wo (interjection and n.), Old English (interjection), c. Old Saxon, Old High German wē, Old Norse vei, Gothic wai, Latin vae]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.woe - misery resulting from affliction
miserableness, misery, wretchedness - a state of ill-being due to affliction or misfortune; "the misery and wretchedness of those slums is intolerable"
2.woe - intense mournfulness
mournfulness, ruthfulness, sorrowfulness - a state of gloomy sorrow

woe

woe

noun
1. A state of physical or mental suffering:
2. A state of prolonged anguish and privation:
3. A cause of suffering or harm:
Translations
بَلاء، بُؤْس، حُزْن شَديد
sorg
surutuska
sorg, harmur
liūdesio prislėgtas
bēdasnelaimeposts
bieda

woe

[wəʊ] N (poet, hum) → desgracia f, aflicción f
woe is me!¡ay de mí!
woe betide you if you're lying!¡pobre de ti como sea mentira!
a tale of woeuna historia triste

woe

[ˈwəʊ]
n (= great sadness) → malheur m
a tale of woe (account of sb's misfortunes)une histoire malheureuse
He listened to my tale of woe → Il écouta ma triste histoire.
woe betide sb → malheur à qn woes
npl (= troubles) → malheurs mpl

woe

n
(liter, hum, sorrow) → Jammer m; woe (is me)!weh mir!; woe betide him who …!wehe dem, der …!; a tale of woeeine Geschichte des Jammers
(esp pl: = trouble, affliction) → Kummer m; to pour out one’s woes to somebodysich (dat)seinen Kummer bei jdm von der Seele reden

woe

[wəʊ] n (liter) (hum) → dolore m
woe is me! → me tapino/a!
woe betide him who ... → guai a chi...
a tale of woe → una triste storia

woe

(wəu) noun
(a cause of) grief or misery. He has many woes; He told a tale of woe.
ˈwoeful adjective
miserable; unhappy. a woeful expression.
ˈwoefully adverb
ˈwoefulness noun
ˈwoebegone (-bigon) adjective
sad-looking. a woebegone face.
References in classic literature ?
Like one who after a night of drunken revelry hies to his bed, still reeling, but with conscience yet pricking him, as the plungings of the Roman race-horse but so much the more strike his steel tags into him; as one who in that miserable plight still turns and turns in giddy anguish, praying God for annihilation until the fit be passed; and at last amid the whirl of woe he feels, a deep stupor steals over him, as over the man who bleeds to death, for conscience is the wound, and there's naught to staunch it; so, after sore wrestlings in his berth, Jonah's prodigy of ponderous misery drags him drowning down to sleep.
As we have seen, God came upon him in the whale, and swallowed him down to living gulfs of doom, and with swift slantings tore him along"into the midst of the seas," where the eddying depths sucked him ten thousand fathoms down, and"the weeds were wrapped about his head," and all the watery world of woe bowled over him.
Woe to him who would not be true, even though to be false were salvation
for it must needs be that offenses come; but woe to that man by whom the offense cometh.
But woe unto you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites
His eyes had fallen to the words on the top paper in his hands--"But woe unto you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites
And he picked up his sermon notes, tore straight through the sheets, and cast them from him, so that on one side of his chair lay "But woe unto you," and on the other, "scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites
Since thou dost in thy cruelty desire The ruthless rigour of thy tyranny From tongue to tongue, from land to land proclaimed, The very Hell will I constrain to lend This stricken breast of mine deep notes of woe To serve my need of fitting utterance.
The lion's roar, the fierce wolf's savage howl, The horrid hissing of the scaly snake, The awesome cries of monsters yet unnamed, The crow's ill-boding croak, the hollow moan Of wild winds wrestling with the restless sea, The wrathful bellow of the vanquished bull, The plaintive sobbing of the widowed dove, The envied owl's sad note, the wail of woe That rises from the dreary choir of Hell, Commingled in one sound, confusing sense, Let all these come to aid my soul's complaint, For pain like mine demands new modes of song.
And while I suffer thus, there comes no ray Of hope to gladden me athwart the gloom; Nor do I look for it in my despair; But rather clinging to a cureless woe, All hope do I abjure for evermore.
The specific research questions addressed were "What are the effects of WOE types used in pre-training on the learners' cognitive load in an animation-based learning environment?
Casting Call Woe is at Gilded at the Museum until August 28.