woe


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woe

 (wō)
n.
1. Sorrow or grief; misery. See Synonyms at regret.
2.
a. Misfortune or wretchedness: listened to his tale of woe.
b. A cause of sorrow or misery; a misfortune: economic and political woes.
interj.
Used to express sorrow or dismay.
Idioms:
woe betide (someone)
1. Used to express the wish for someone to experience misfortune.
2. Used as a warning or allusion to negative consequences: "Even though my dad was no farmer, he was a crack shot and a very good hunter&.... woe betide the unwary moose that wandered down from Canada" (Howard Frank Mosher).
woe is me
Used to lament one's situation or fate.
woe to (someone)
1. Used to express the wish for someone to experience misfortune.
2. Used as a warning or allusion to negative consequences: "Our sun will be a red giant, and woe to any earthlings who may be around to witness its bloated blush, for the planet on which they stand will likely be vaporized in the expansion" (Natalie Angier).

[Middle English wa, wo, from Old English , woe!]

woe

(wəʊ)
n
1. literary intense grief or misery
2. (often plural) affliction or misfortune
3. woe betide someone misfortune will befall someone: woe betide you if you arrive late.
interj
archaic Also: woe is me an exclamation of sorrow or distress
[Old English wā, wǣ; related to Old Saxon, Old High German wē, Old Norse vei, Gothic wai, Latin vae, Sanskrit uvē; see wail]

woe

(woʊ)

n.
1. grievous distress, affliction, or trouble.
2. an affliction: She suffered a fall, among her other woes.
interj.
3. (used to express grief, distress, or lamentation.)
[before 900; Middle English wo (interjection and n.), Old English (interjection), c. Old Saxon, Old High German wē, Old Norse vei, Gothic wai, Latin vae]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.woe - misery resulting from affliction
miserableness, misery, wretchedness - a state of ill-being due to affliction or misfortune; "the misery and wretchedness of those slums is intolerable"
2.woe - intense mournfulness
mournfulness, ruthfulness, sorrowfulness - a state of gloomy sorrow

woe

woe

noun
1. A state of physical or mental suffering:
2. A state of prolonged anguish and privation:
3. A cause of suffering or harm:
Translations
بَلاء، بُؤْس، حُزْن شَديد
sorg
surutuska
sorg, harmur
liūdesio prislėgtas
bēdasnelaimeposts
bieda

woe

[wəʊ] N (poet, hum) → desgracia f, aflicción f
woe is me!¡ay de mí!
woe betide you if you're lying!¡pobre de ti como sea mentira!
a tale of woeuna historia triste

woe

[ˈwəʊ]
n (= great sadness) → malheur m
a tale of woe (account of sb's misfortunes)une histoire malheureuse
He listened to my tale of woe → Il écouta ma triste histoire.
woe betide sb → malheur à qn woes
npl (= troubles) → malheurs mpl

woe

n
(liter, hum, sorrow) → Jammer m; woe (is me)!weh mir!; woe betide him who …!wehe dem, der …!; a tale of woeeine Geschichte des Jammers
(esp pl: = trouble, affliction) → Kummer m; to pour out one’s woes to somebodysich (dat)seinen Kummer bei jdm von der Seele reden

woe

[wəʊ] n (liter) (hum) → dolore m
woe is me! → me tapino/a!
woe betide him who ... → guai a chi...
a tale of woe → una triste storia

woe

(wəu) noun
(a cause of) grief or misery. He has many woes; He told a tale of woe.
ˈwoeful adjective
miserable; unhappy. a woeful expression.
ˈwoefully adverb
ˈwoefulness noun
ˈwoebegone (-bigon) adjective
sad-looking. a woebegone face.
References in classic literature ?
Woe betide the wretch who is born to behold this plain, with the judgment hanging about his soul
It has worked already too much woe upon us all; why should it carry his brave and youthful soul down with it?
From the look of unutterable woe upon his face, it appeared to be his doom to spend eternity in a vain effort to make his accounts balance.
Looking down it from the top I once recognized the presence of a woman seated on one of the lower steps with her back presented to me, her body half-bowed and her head, in an attitude of woe, in her hands.
Like one who after a night of drunken revelry hies to his bed, still reeling, but with conscience yet pricking him, as the plungings of the Roman race-horse but so much the more strike his steel tags into him; as one who in that miserable plight still turns and turns in giddy anguish, praying God for annihilation until the fit be passed; and at last amid the whirl of woe he feels, a deep stupor steals over him, as over the man who bleeds to death, for conscience is the wound, and there's naught to staunch it; so, after sore wrestlings in his berth, Jonah's prodigy of ponderous misery drags him drowning down to sleep.
This delicacy is chiefly evinced in the action of sweeping, when in maidenly gentleness the whale with a certain soft slowness moves his immense flukes from side to side upon the surface of the sea; and if he feel but a sailor's whisker, woe to that sailor, whiskers and all.
The woe of this would flame up in Ona sometimes--at night she would suddenly clasp her big husband in her arms and break into passionate weeping, demanding to know if he really loved her.
Tom, who had, to the full, the gentle, domestic heart, which woe for them
In the one case a man lies dead-alive four genera- tions -- mummified in ignorance and sloth -- and that qualifies him to command live people, and take their weal and woe into his impotent hands; and in the other case, a man lies bedded with death and worms four generations, and that qualifies him for office in the celestial camp.
The shipper in the little ship It effects with woe sad might; He does not see the rocky slip, He only regards dreaded height.
But woe unto you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites
Thou hast suffered much woe because of the witchcraft of thine enemies.