woebegone


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woe·be·gone

 (wō′bĭ-gôn′, -gŏn′)
adj.
1. Feeling, showing, or expressing deep sorrow, grief, or wretchedness: "He was woebegone at the thought of losing my mother's voice from the choir" (John Irving). See Synonyms at sad.
2. Of an inferior or deplorable condition: a rundown, woebegone old shack.

[Middle English wo begon, beset with woe : wo, woe; see woe + begon, past participle of begon, to beset (from Old English begān : be-, be- + gān, to go; see go1).]

woe′be·gone′ness n.

woebegone

(ˈwəʊbɪˌɡɒn)
adj
1. sorrowful or sad in appearance
2. archaic afflicted with woe
[C14: from a phrase such as me is wo begon woe has beset me]

woe•be•gone

(ˈwoʊ bɪˌgɔn, -ˌgɒn)

adj.
1. beset with woe.
2. showing or indicating woe; forlorn.
[1300–50; Middle English wo begon orig., woe (has or had) surrounded (someone); wo woe + begon, past participle of begon, Old English begān to surround, besiege (see be-, go1)]

woebegone

- Begone in woebegone means "beset" or "surrounded," so the word means "beset by woe."
See also related terms for surrounded.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.woebegone - worn and broken down by hard use; "a creaky shack"; "a decrepit bus...its seats held together with friction tape"; "a flea-bitten sofa"; "a run-down neighborhood"; "a woebegone old shack"
worn - affected by wear; damaged by long use; "worn threads on the screw"; "a worn suit"; "the worn pockets on the jacket"
2.woebegone - affected by or full of grief or woe; "his sorrow...made him look...haggard and...woebegone"- George du Maurier
sorrowful - experiencing or marked by or expressing sorrow especially that associated with irreparable loss; "sorrowful widows"; "a sorrowful tale of death and despair"; "sorrowful news"; "even in laughter the heart is sorrowful"- Proverbs 14:13

woebegone

woebegone

adjective
1. Suffering from usually prolonged anguish:
2. Full of or expressive of sorrow:
Translations
مُكْفَهِر، كاسِف، بائِس، حزين
bedrøvetsørgmodig
sorgbitinn
bedrövad
elemlikederli

woebegone

[ˈwəʊbɪˌgɒn] ADJ (liter) → desconsolado, angustiado

woebegone

[ˈwəʊbɪgɒn] adjaffligé(e)

woebegone

adjkläglich, jämmerlich; expression alsojammervoll; voice(weh)klagend, jammernd

woebegone

[ˈwəʊbɪˌgɒn] adjtriste

woe

(wəu) noun
(a cause of) grief or misery. He has many woes; He told a tale of woe.
ˈwoeful adjective
miserable; unhappy. a woeful expression.
ˈwoefully adverb
ˈwoefulness noun
ˈwoebegone (-bigon) adjective
sad-looking. a woebegone face.
References in classic literature ?
What is the ruinous discount which Mordecai, the broker, gets from poor Woebegone, the bankrupt, on a loan to keep Woebegone's family from starvation; what is that ruinous discount but a Fast-Fish?
Lift me up," said the wretched Sancho in a woebegone voice.
In short, so helpless and woebegone was his plight, that his party proceeded on their march without him; the captain promised to bring him on in safety in the after part of the day.
Some cling to you in woebegone misery; others come back fiercely and weirdly, like ghouls bent upon sucking your strength away; others, again, have a catastrophic splendour; some are unvenerated recollections, as of spiteful wild-cats clawing at your agonized vitals; others are severe, like a visitation; and one or two rise up draped and mysterious, with an aspect of ominous menace.
Puncturing her tire near Summer Street, and it being mended while she sat very woebegone in that pretty churchyard, she saw to her astonishment, a door open opposite and the younger Emerson man come out.
Vholes, preceded by the legend Ground-Floor, is inscribed upon a door-post in Symond's Inn, Chancery Lane--a little, pale, wall-eyed, woebegone inn like a large dust-binn of two compartments and a sifter.
The pier was crowded with carriages and men; passengers were arriving and hurrying on board; the vessel's decks were encumbered with trunks and valises; groups of excursionists, arrayed in unattractive traveling costumes, were moping about in a drizzling rain and looking as droopy and woebegone as so many molting chickens.
He looked woebegone and yet ridiculous, like a man who has fallen into the water with all his clothes on, and, being rescued from death, frightened still, feels that he only looks a fool.
But when the two stout beggars that had been rapped upon the head roused themselves and sat up, and when the others had gotten over their fright and come back, they were as sad and woebegone as four frogs in dry weather, for two of them had cracked crowns, their Malmsey was all gone, and they had not so much as a farthing to cross their palms withal.
My sister is down with one of the headaches against which even she cannot fight, and my mother, who bears physical pain as if it were a comrade, is most woebegone when her daughter is the sufferer.
Monty turned a woebegone face around the little room.
The boy's real name was Romeo, but everyone called him Lamp-Wick, for he was long and thin and had a woebegone look about him.