wolf pack

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wolf pack

n.
A group of people or machines that aggressively pursue something, especially a group of submarines that attack a single vessel or a convoy.

wolf′ pack`


n.
a group of submarines operating as a unit to detect and destroy enemy convoys.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wolf pack - a group of submarines operating together in attacking enemy convoys
fleet - a group of warships organized as a tactical unit
2.wolf pack - a group of wolves hunting together
pack - a group of hunting animals
Translations

wolf pack

nRudel ntWölfe; (of submarines)Geschwader nt
References in classic literature ?
And that is how Mowgli was entered into the Seeonee Wolf Pack for the price of a bull and on Baloo's good word.
The Farmers' Almanac describes January's Full Wolf Moon as: "Amid the cold and deep snows of midwinter, the wolf packs howled hungrily outside Indian villages.
That's the pattern seen in wolf packs today, says Gust.
After the disappearance of the last wolf packs aspen and cottonwood trees went into long-term decline, to the point of virtual extinction in some areas.
The scientists are using data from observations in Ethiopia about where the wolf packs travel and about interaction between different packs.
Heavy-handedly, the NCAA is trying to do the right thing, convince universities that claim to ``honor'' American Indians that nicknames and mascots connoting the same primitive ferocity as Wolf Packs, Wildcats, Cougars, Gators and Hurricanes is a strange way to honor human beings.
It was from here that Admiral Sir Max Horton co-ordinated the tactics that eventually delivered this nation from starvation at the hands of the U-boat wolf packs seemingly roaming at will.
The goal is to protect the full range of two of Denali's wolf packs, the Toklat and Mount Margaret packs--the most viewed wolves in the world.
During the summer of 1998, Idaho attained the important recovery benchmark of 10 breeding wolf packs just 3 years after the original translocations.
The board's tactics included reducing 15 nearby wolf packs to a pair of animals each and relocating "subordinate wolves.