woman suffrage


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Related to woman suffrage: Civil Rights movement

woman suffrage

n.
1. The right of women to vote; exercise of the franchise by women.
2. A movement to promote and secure such rights.

wom′an suf′frage


n.
the right of women to vote.
[1840–50]
wom′an-suf′fra•gist, n.
References in classic literature ?
For, be it known, in my younger days, despite my ardent democracy, I had been opposed to woman suffrage.
Simultaneously, the grassroots activism of Stanton and Anthony's rivals, particularly that of individuals such as Lucy Stone, who led the American Woman Suffrage Association, largely disappeared from historical memory just as their archival remains were heavily excised from the History of Woman Suffrage.
She was active in the National Woman's Party and a key participant in the Woman Suffrage Parade of 1913.
For generations, long before 24-year-old Burn was born, the woman suffrage movement had as its goal an amendment to the U.
American woman suffrage movement has been treated at length in the
In this book, Harris (English, University of Connecticut) goes far to bring Walker out of the shadows, presenting a well-rounded account of her life that includes Walker's career as the first female Army surgeon (winning the Medal of Honor during the Civil War) and as a tireless activist for abolition, temperance, woman suffrage, and gender equality.
Years later, Anthony, Stanton, Matilda Joslyn Gage and Ida Husted Harper collaborated to write the four-volume The History of Woman Suffrage, published from 1884 to 1887.
The schism between the Stanton-Anthony group based in New York and Stone's suffragettes based in New England - Stanton called them the "Boston malcontents" in a Revolution editorial - led to the forming of two organizations, the National Woman Suffrage Association and the American Woman Suffrage Association.
When she died [in 1906], few thinking people denied either the logic or the inevitability of woman suffrage.
Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton form the National Woman Suffrage Association (NWSA).
In Wyoming, the first state to grant woman suffrage, this became a test of whether women actually had enough political power to overcome the demands of leading male citizens that the governor impose a strict rule of law.