womanism


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wom·an·ist

 (wo͝om′ən-ĭst)
adj.
Having or expressing a belief in or respect for women and their talents and abilities beyond the boundaries of race and class.
n.
One whose beliefs or actions are informed by womanist ideals.

wom′an·ism n.

womanism

(ˈwʊməˌnɪzəm)
n
(Sociology) feminism among non-White, esp Black, theorists
References in periodicals archive ?
Re-discoursing African Womanhood in the Search for Sustainable Renaissance: Africana Womanism in Multi-disciplinary Approaches.
Chikwenye Ogunyemi, sees womanism as "a philosophy that celebrates black roots, the ideals of black life, while giving a balanced presentation of black womandom".
Through and in her art, then, Breeze models the need for and routes to Afrasporic female empowerment, and nowhere is her Jamaican womanism more evident than in her late career poems "The Wife of Bath Speaks in Brixton Market" and "Slam Poem.
Meanwhile, in other news it has been reported that University of Texas has decided to include a study on "Beyonce Feminism, Rihanna Womanism," in their African-American studies class.
Grounded in the rich offerings of black feminism and womanism, Coleman's edited collection clarifies and envisions an emerging third wave of womanist religious thought.
4) I also use Alice Walker's definition of womanism.
After all, black womanism arose in large measure precisely because of the need to combat black male sexism.
They also analyze the relationship between her writing and womanism, adaptations for children in historical novels for young readers, her work in relation to other Harlem Renaissance writers like Langston Hughes, its critical reception, and the financial support Hurston received from Charlotte Osgood Mason.
I would love to talk to your about third wave feminion and the necessary of womanism.
Black pride, black nationalism, antiracism, feminism, and womanism are among the world-views frequently articulated in conscious hip hop.
Miguda described women's multiple oppressions and the subsequent advent of various women's movements such as black feminism, African feminism, womanism, and white feminism.