wonders


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

won·der

 (wŭn′dər)
n.
1.
a. The emotion aroused by something awe-inspiring, astounding, or surprising: gazed with wonder at the northern lights.
b. The quality that arouses such emotion: "Her long fair hair was girlish: and girlish, and touched with the wonder of mortal beauty, her face" (James Joyce).
2.
a. One that arouses awe, astonishment, surprise, or admiration; a marvel: Given all his unhealthy habits, it's a wonder he's lived this long. She was a wonder in that movie.
b. often Wonder A monumental human creation regarded with awe, especially one of seven monuments of the ancient world that appeared on various lists of late antiquity.
3.
a. An extraordinary or remarkable act or achievement: That teacher has worked wonders with these students.
b. An event inexplicable by the laws of nature; a miracle.
v. won·dered, won·der·ing, won·ders
v.intr.
1. To have a feeling of awe, astonishment, surprise, or admiration: We wondered at the ease with which she settled into her new job.
2. To be filled with curiosity or doubt: I could only wonder after hearing his excuse. I wondered about his late-night comings and goings.
v.tr.
To feel curiosity or be in doubt about: I wondered what kind of costume she would wear. I wondered why I said that.
adj.
Remarkable or extraordinary, especially in being beneficial: considers quinoa a wonder grain.
Idioms:
do wonders
To have a beneficial effect: This tonic will do wonders for you.
for a wonder
As a cause for surprise; surprisingly.

[Middle English, from Old English wundor.]

won′der·er n.
Synonyms: wonder, marvel, miracle, phenomenon
These nouns denote one that evokes amazement or admiration: saw the wonders of Paris; a marvel of modern technology; a miracle of culinary art; a phenomenon of medical science.
References in classic literature ?
Rome took all the vanity out of me, for after seeing the wonders there, I felt too insignificant to live and gave up all my foolish hopes in despair.
And yet there are more wonders to tell," went on the professor.
Pontellier gave over being astonished, and concluded that wonders would never cease.
wonders sent 'midst thee, On Pharaoh and his servants too
Nature was here a series of wonders, and a fund of delight.
There is a crimson curtain in a trunk above stairs,--a little faded and moth-eaten, I'm afraid,--but Phoebe and I will do wonders with it.
They spoke with far more interest and unction of their morning's breakfast, or yesterday's, to-day's, or tomorrow's dinner, than of the shipwreck of forty or fifty years ago, and all the world's wonders which they had witnessed with their youthful eyes.
We had it from him again before the fire in the hall, as we had had our mild wonders of the previous night.
Mark ye, be forewarned; Ahab's above the common; Ahab's been in colleges, as well as 'mong the cannibals; been used to deeper wonders than the waves; fixed his fiery lance in mightier stranger foes than whales.
Jokubas did this with the air of a country gentleman escorting a party of visitors over his estate; he was an old-time resident, and all these wonders had grown up under his eyes, and he had a personal pride in them.
How, as by an enchanted wand, have its scenes been changed, since Chateaubriand wrote his prose-poetic description of it,[1] as a river of mighty, unbroken solitudes, rolling amid undreamed wonders of vegetable and animal existence.
Everybody around her believed in enchant- ments; nobody had any doubts; to doubt that a castle could be turned into a sty, and its occupants into hogs, would have been the same as my doubting among Con- necticut people the actuality of the telephone and its wonders, -- and in both cases would be absolute proof of a diseased mind, an unsettled reason.