woodcut


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wood·cut

 (wo͝od′kŭt′)
n.
1. A block of wood on whose surface a design for printing is engraved along the grain.
2. A print made from a woodcut. Also called woodblock, woodprint.

woodcut

(ˈwʊdˌkʌt)
n
1. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) a block of wood cut along the grain and with a design, illustration, etc, incised with a knife, from which prints are made
2. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) a print from a woodcut

wood•cut

(ˈwʊdˌkʌt)

n.
1. a block of wood engraved in relief, from which prints are made; woodblock.
2. a print or impression from such a block.
[1655–65]

woodcut

A form of relief printing in which a design is cut or gouged out of the surface of a block of hardwood. Ink or paint is then applied to the surface to print out the design. Separate blocks can be used for multicolored images or, especially in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Japan where the technique was perfected, different areas of a single block may also be inked differently.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.woodcut - a print made from a woodcut
engraving - a print made from an engraving
2.woodcut - engraving consisting of a block of wood with a design cut into it; used to make prints
engraving - a block or plate or other hard surface that has been engraved
Translations
رَسْم مَطبوع من حَفْرٍ على خَشَب
dřevoryt
træsnit
puukaiverrus
fametszet
drevorez
tahta basma kalıbı
дереворит

woodcut

[ˈwʊdkʌt] Ngrabado m en madera

woodcut

[ˈwʊdˌkʌt] nincisione f su legno

wood

(wud) noun
1. (also adjective) (of) the material of which the trunk and branches of trees are composed. My desk is (made of) wood; She gathered some wood for the fire; I like the smell of a wood fire.
2. (often in plural) a group of growing trees. They went for a walk in the woods.
3. a golf-club whose head is made of wood.
ˈwooded adjective
(of land) covered with trees. a wooded hillside.
ˈwooden adjective
made of wood. three wooden chairs.
ˈwoody adjective
1. covered with trees. woody countryside.
2. (of a smell etc) of or like wood.
ˈwood carving noun
the art of carving wood.
ˈwoodcut noun
a print made by pressing a block of wood with design cut on it onto paper.
ˈwoodcutter noun
a person whose job is felling trees.
ˈwoodland noun
land covered with woods. a stretch of woodland.
ˈwoodlouseplural ˈwoodlice noun
a tiny creature with a jointed shell, found under stones etc.
ˈwoodpecker noun
a type of bird which pecks holes in the bark of trees, searching for insects.
ˈwood pulp noun
pulp from wood that can be used for making paper.
ˈwoodwind (-wind) noun
(in an orchestra, the group of people who play) wind instruments made of wood.
ˈwoodwork noun
1. the art of making things from wood; carpentry. He did woodwork at school.
2. the wooden part of any structure. The woodwork in the house is rotting.
ˈwoodwormplurals ˈwoodworm, ~woodworms noun
the larva of a certain type of beetle, which bores into wood and destroys it.
out of the wood(s)
out of danger.
References in classic literature ?
I may here mention, that on a part of the coast of Ascension, where there is a vast accumulation of shelly sand, an incrustation is deposited on the tidal rocks by the water of the sea, resembling, as represented in the woodcut, certain cryptogamic plants (Marchantiae) often seen on damp walls.
One person of mild and benevolent aspect even gave me a tract ornamented with a woodcut of a malevolent young man fitted up with a perfect sausage-shop of fetters, and entitled, TO BE READ IN MY CELL.
Mr Parkes, who was possibly a hard-sleeper himself, replied with some disdain, 'Not a bit on it;' and directed his eyes towards a handbill pasted over the chimney-piece, which was decorated at the top with a woodcut representing a youth of tender years running away very fast, with a bundle over his shoulder at the end of a stick, and--to carry out the idea--a finger-post and a milestone beside him.
The handbill had the usual rude woodcut of a turbaned Negro woman running, with the customary bundle on a stick over her shoulder, and the heading in bold type, "$100 REWARD.
He caught my eye on that spiritedly composed woodcut.
If you had been, we might have had a large woodcut of the last scene for the posters, showing the whole depth of the stage, with the pump and tubs in the middle; but, however, if you're not, it can't be helped.
For this new edition adds to the original merits of the work the very substantial charm of abundant illustrations, first-rate in subject and execution, and of three kinds--copper-plate likenesses of actors and other personages connected with theatrical history; a series of delicate, picturesque, highly detailed woodcuts of theatrical topography, chiefly the little old theatres; and, by way of tail-pieces to the chapters, a second series of woodcuts of a vigour and reality of information, within very limited compass, which make one think of Callot and the German [76] "little masters," depicting Garrick and other famous actors in their favourite scenes.
But the seaman of the last generation, brought into sympathy with the caravels of ancient time by his sailing-ship, their lineal descendant, cannot look upon those lumbering forms navigating the naive seas of ancient woodcuts without a feeling of surprise, of affectionate derision, envy, and admiration.
Rostopchin's broadsheets, headed by woodcuts of a drink shop, a potman, and a Moscow burgher called Karpushka Chigirin, "who- having been a militiaman and having had rather too much at the pub- heard that Napoleon wished to come to Moscow, grew angry, abused the French in very bad language, came out of the drink shop, and, under the sign of the eagle, began to address the assembled people," were read and discussed, together with the latest of Vasili Lvovich Pushkin's bouts rimes.
We may give a further word of mention to the voluminous Francis Quarles, who in his own day and long after enjoyed enormous popularity, especially among members of the Church of England and especially for his 'Emblems,' a book of a sort common in Europe for a century before his time, in which fantastic woodcuts, like Vaughan's 'Silex Scintillans,' were illustrated with short poems of religious emotion, chiefly dominated by fear.
In my memory there was a succession of such pictures, fixed there like the old woodcuts of one's first primer: Antonia kicking her bare legs against the sides of my pony when we came home in triumph with our snake; Antonia in her black shawl and fur cap, as she stood by her father's grave in the snowstorm; Antonia coming in with her work-team along the evening sky-line.
Miss Murdstone's heavy eyebrows followed me to the door - I say her eyebrows rather than her eyes, because they were much more important in her face - and she looked so exactly as she used to look, at about that hour of the morning, in our parlour at Blunderstone, that I could have fancied I had been breaking down in my lessons again, and that the dead weight on my mind was that horrible old spelling-book, with oval woodcuts, shaped, to my youthful fancy, like the glasses out of spectacles.