woodpecker


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Related to woodpecker: pileated woodpecker, downy woodpecker

wood·peck·er

 (wo͝od′pĕk′ər)
n.
Any of various birds of the family Picidae, having strong claws and a stiff tail adapted for clinging to and climbing trees and a chisellike bill for drilling through bark and wood.

woodpecker

(ˈwʊdˌpɛkə)
n
(Animals) any climbing bird of the family Picidae, typically having a brightly coloured plumage and strong chisel-like bill with which they bore into trees for insects: order Piciformes

wood•peck•er

(ˈwʊdˌpɛk ər)

n.
any of numerous climbing birds of the family Picidae, of nearly worldwide distribution, having a chisellike bill that is hammered repeatedly into wood in search of insects and stiff tail feathers that assist in climbing: often boldy patterned.
[1520–30]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.woodpecker - bird with strong claws and a stiff tail adapted for climbing and a hard chisel-like bill for boring into wood for insectswoodpecker - bird with strong claws and a stiff tail adapted for climbing and a hard chisel-like bill for boring into wood for insects
piciform bird - any of numerous nonpasserine insectivorous climbing birds usually having strong bills for boring wood
family Picidae, Picidae - woodpeckers
green woodpecker, Picus viridis - woodpecker of Europe and western Asia
downy woodpecker - small North American woodpecker with black and white plumage and a small bill
flicker - North American woodpecker
Campephilus principalis, ivorybill, ivory-billed woodpecker - large black-and-white woodpecker of southern United States and Cuba having an ivory bill; nearly extinct
Melanerpes erythrocephalus, redheaded woodpecker, redhead - black-and-white North American woodpecker having a red head and neck
sapsucker - small American woodpecker that feeds on sap from e.g. apple and maple trees
wryneck - Old World woodpecker with a peculiar habit of twisting the neck
piculet - small woodpeckers of South America and Africa and East Indies having soft rounded tail feathers
Translations
نَقّار الخَشَب
кълвач
spætte
pego
pájaro carpinteropito
rähn
دارکوب
tikka
djetaožuna
harkályfakopáncs
burung pelatuk
spæta
picus
ciocănitoareghionoaie
ďateľ
дятел

woodpecker

[ˈwʊdˌpekəʳ] Npájaro m carpintero
green woodpeckerpito m real
lesser spotted woodpeckerpico m menor

woodpecker

[ˈwʊdpɛkər] npic m (oiseau)wood pigeon npigeon m ramier, ramier m

woodpecker

[ˈwʊdˌpɛkəʳ] npicchio

wood

(wud) noun
1. (also adjective) (of) the material of which the trunk and branches of trees are composed. My desk is (made of) wood; She gathered some wood for the fire; I like the smell of a wood fire.
2. (often in plural) a group of growing trees. They went for a walk in the woods.
3. a golf-club whose head is made of wood.
ˈwooded adjective
(of land) covered with trees. a wooded hillside.
ˈwooden adjective
made of wood. three wooden chairs.
ˈwoody adjective
1. covered with trees. woody countryside.
2. (of a smell etc) of or like wood.
ˈwood carving noun
the art of carving wood.
ˈwoodcut noun
a print made by pressing a block of wood with design cut on it onto paper.
ˈwoodcutter noun
a person whose job is felling trees.
ˈwoodland noun
land covered with woods. a stretch of woodland.
ˈwoodlouseplural ˈwoodlice noun
a tiny creature with a jointed shell, found under stones etc.
ˈwoodpecker noun
a type of bird which pecks holes in the bark of trees, searching for insects.
ˈwood pulp noun
pulp from wood that can be used for making paper.
ˈwoodwind (-wind) noun
(in an orchestra, the group of people who play) wind instruments made of wood.
ˈwoodwork noun
1. the art of making things from wood; carpentry. He did woodwork at school.
2. the wooden part of any structure. The woodwork in the house is rotting.
ˈwoodwormplurals ˈwoodworm, ~woodworms noun
the larva of a certain type of beetle, which bores into wood and destroys it.
out of the wood(s)
out of danger.
References in classic literature ?
In one very limited sense, as we shall hereafter see, this may be true; but it is preposterous to attribute to mere external conditions, the structure, for instance, of the woodpecker, with its feet, tail, beak, and tongue, so admirably adapted to catch insects under the bark of trees.
A woodpecker stuck his impudent head around the side of a tree.
From somewhere came the distant knocking of a woodpecker.
By a fence he had stopped and beating like a giant woodpecker upon the top board had shouted at George Willard, condemning his tendency to be too much influenced by the people about him, "You are destroying yourself," he cried.
Now, far away in the woods a bird called; another answered; presently the hammering of a woodpecker was heard.
I dried myself in the sun, and dressed slowly, reluctant to leave that green enclosure where the sunlight flickered so bright through the grapevine leaves and the woodpecker hammered away in the crooked elm that trailed out over the water.
Still that breathing silence, which marks the drowsy sultriness of an American landscape in July, pervaded the secluded spot, interrupted only by the low voices of the men, the occasional and lazy tap of a woodpecker, the discordant cry of some gaudy jay, or a swelling on the ear, from the dull roar of a distant waterfall.
They brought him things to look at--buds which were opening, buds which were tight closed, bits of twig whose leaves were just showing green, the feather of a woodpecker which had dropped on the grass, the empty shell of some bird early hatched.
Then we kissed and parted, and I watched Macropha, my wife, and Nada, my daughter, till they melted into the sky, as they walked upon their journey to Swaziland, and was very sad, because, having lost Umslopogaas, he who in after days was named the Slaughterer and the Woodpecker, I must lose them also.
But the artist, with a heart as callous as that of an army surgeon, continued his performance, enlivening his labours with a wild chant, tapping away the while as merrily as a woodpecker.
Chattering jays and loud wood-pigeons flapped thickly overhead, while ever and anon the measured tapping of Nature's carpenter, the great green woodpecker, sounded from each wayside grove.
A small brook glides through it, with just murmur enough to lull one to repose; and the occasional whistle of a quail or tapping of a woodpecker is almost the only sound that ever breaks in upon the uniform tranquillity.