woolgrower

wool·grow·er

 (wo͝ol′grō′ər)
n.
One that raises sheep or other animals for the production of wool.

wool′grow′ing n.

woolgrower

(ˈwʊlˌɡrəʊə)
n
(Agriculture) a person who keeps sheep for their wool
ˈwoolˌgrowing n, adj
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References in periodicals archive ?
Our report: e-Marketplaces that suck: Woolnet is fiercely critical of what is a disastrous waste of woolgrower funds and by no means the answer to the industry's needs.
The days when a woolgrower might buy a new Mercedes-Benz with big annual woolclip cheques are long gone.
Andrew Campbell is a fifth generation woolgrower from south eastern Australia, who was a consultant to the Australian Government in the role of National Landcare Facilitator from 1989-92.
Australia supplies around 50 per cent of the wool used in India's fashion and textile sector -- we are proud of this collaboration between Australian woolgrowers, an iconic part of our farming sector, and contemporary fashion, one of most dynamic and exciting sectors in both India and Australia.
Woolgrowers got the campaign off to a good start with a donation of approximately 500 000 sheepskins.
Over 800 guests, including fashion designers, celebrities and around 250 international journalists will attend the Awards, held to recognise excellence amongst Australia s superfine woolgrowers.
The Coolie Association drafted a memorial claiming that only cheap Indian labour could save woolgrowers from ruin and that they should be allowed to share the advantages of coolies with Mauritius.
He built and sold several tanneries, speculated in land sales, raised sheep, and established a brokerage for woolgrowers.
Geneticists can now use this figure to help woolgrowers design breeding programs for reduced felting.
And then I spoke to the woolgrowers on the following two days.
McKinsey&Co (2000), Report to New Zealand Woolgrowers on Improving Profitability, Summary of Recommendations, McKinsey&Company, June.
So much for the idea that predation is not a problem for woolgrowers.