woolliness


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Related to woolliness: fleecer

wool·ly

also wool·y  (wo͝ol′ē)
adj. wool·li·er, wool·li·est also wool·i·er or wool·i·est
1.
a. Relating to, consisting of, or covered with wool.
b. Resembling wool.
2.
a. Lacking sharp detail or clarity: woolly television reception.
b. Mentally or intellectually disorganized or unclear: woolly thinking.
3. Rough, disorderly, or unrestrained: "newspaper ads called for ... stricter gun control everywhere in this wild and woolly nation" (Ed McBain).
n. pl. wool·lies also wool·ies
1. A garment made of wool, especially an undergarment of knitted wool.
2. Australian A sheep.

wool′li·ness n.
Translations
صوفِيَّه
uldenhed
gyapjasság
e-r/e-î sem er óskÿr/ruglingslegur
zmätenosť
yünlülük

woolliness

wooliness (US) [ˈwʊlɪnɪs] N
1. [of material, garment, sheep] → lanosidad f, lo lanoso
2. (= vagueness) [of ideas, thinking, essay] → vaguedad f, imprecisión f; [of person] → confusión f

woolliness

, (US) wooliness
nWolligkeit f; (= softness also)Flauschigkeit f; (fig: of outline) → Verschwommenheit f; (pej, of mind, idea) → Verworrenheit f, → Wirrheit f

wool

(wul) noun, adjective
(of) the soft hair of sheep and some other animals, often made into yarn etc for knitting or into fabric for making clothes etc. I wear wool in winter; knitting-wool; a wool blanket.
ˈwoollen adjective
made of wool. a woollen hat.
ˈwoollens noun plural
clothes (especially jumpers etc) made of wool. Woollens should be washed by hand.
ˈwoolly adjective
1. made of, or like, wool. a woolly jumper/rug.
2. (also ˌwoolly-ˈheaded) (of a person) vague or hazy. She's too woolly(-headed) to be in charge of a department.
nounplural ˈwoollies
a knitted garment.
ˈwoolliness noun
pull the wool over someone's eyes
to deceive someone.
References in periodicals archive ?
Von Mollendorff LJ Woolliness in peaches and nectarines: A review-Maturity and external factors.
The woolliness of Wallace's denial has prompted an angry response from the Union of Fans group representing the rump of Gers' supporters' groups.
Australia is fortunate to have largely weathered the global downturn and to possess a federal structure that permits a degree of woolliness at the top.
Sadly, when it came, there was vagueness and woolliness in the possible use of pension fund assets for infrastructure.
A basic element of this misfortune is the seminal absence of intellectual rigour in the political thought of our founding fathers--a tendency to pious materialistic woolliness and self-centred pedestrianism (Trouble, 11).
BIG SOCIETY WAS MASKING EVEN BIGGER CUTS PHIL REDMOND: RUBBISH NAME BUT I STILL BELIEVE IN 'BIG SOCIETY' ECHO political reporter Ian Hernon on how Cameron's 'Big Idea' became regarded as a gimmick to cover a Tory agenda THE Big Society was always going to be undermined by spending cuts, the hype and the woolliness behind its presentation.
Effect of temperature during storage and ripening on firmness, extractable juice and woolliness in nectarines.
You can see the way Dave's mind has worked ever since he won the leadership; you can tell that his hero, his inspiration, was not a great Tory leader of the past such as Margaret Thatcher (yes she was great, for all her faults) but Tony VILLAIN OF WEEK HIS Woolliness, the of Canterbury, for on fellow Christians Catholic Church in while being soft as the enemies of the faith who these to circle, like Blair.
But more importantly, the subtitle of this paper emphasises that family ethnicity is an essentially fictional concept that not only relies on one increasingly problematic concept--"a family"--but adds into this discussion another idea, ethnicity, the woolliness of which is becoming increasing apparent.