wordy


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word·y

 (wûr′dē)
adj. word·i·er, word·i·est
1. Relating to or consisting of words; verbal.
2. Tending to use, using, or expressed in more words than are necessary to convey meaning.

word′i·ly adv.
word′i·ness n.
Synonyms: wordy, diffuse, long-winded, prolix, verbose
These adjectives mean given to using or marked by the use of an excessive number of words: a wordy apology; a diffuse historical novel; a long-winded speaker; a prolix, tedious lecturer; verbose correspondence.

wordy

(ˈwɜːdɪ)
adj, wordier or wordiest
1. using, inclined to use, or containing an excess of words: a wordy writer; a wordy document.
2. of the nature of or relating to words; verbal
ˈwordily adv
ˈwordiness n

word•y

(ˈwɜr di)

adj. word•i•er, word•i•est.
1. characterized by or given to the use of too many words.
2. pertaining to or consisting of words; verbal.
[before 1100]
word′i•ly, adv.
word′i•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.wordy - using or containing too many wordswordy - using or containing too many words; "long-winded (or windy) speakers"; "verbose and ineffective instructional methods"; "newspapers of the day printed long wordy editorials"; "proceedings were delayed by wordy disputes"
prolix - tediously prolonged or tending to speak or write at great length; "editing a prolix manuscript"; "a prolix lecturer telling you more than you want to know"

wordy

wordy

adjective
1. Relating to, consisting of, or having the nature of words:
2. Using or containing an excessive number of words:
Translations

wordy

[ˈwɜːdɪ] ADJ (wordier (compar) (wordiest (superl))) → verboso, prolijo

wordy

[ˈwɜːrdi] adjverbeux/euse

wordy

adj (+er)wortreich, langatmig (pej)

wordy

[ˈwɜːdɪ] adj (-ier (comp) (-iest (superl))) → verboso/a, prolisso/a
References in classic literature ?
On the contrary, he sat rather mute and receptive before her chatty eagerness to make him feel at home and in face of Gaston's frank and wordy hospitality.
If we were left solely to the wordy wit of legislators in Congress for our guidance, uncorrected by the seasonable experience and the effectual complaints of the people, America would not long retain her rank among the nations.
Now I wanted to fit these people out with new suits, on account of that swell company, and I didn't know just how to get at it -- with delicacy, until at last it struck me that as I had already been liberal in inventing wordy gratitude for the king, it would be just the thing to back it up with evidence of a substantial sort; so I said:
The housekeeper and her husband were both of that decent phlegmatic order of people, to whom one may at any time safely communicate a remarkable piece of news without incurring the danger of having one's ears pierced by some shrill ejaculation, and subsequently stunned by a torrent of wordy wonderment.
Some of them struck me as singularly odd compounds of ardour and flatness; commencing in strong feeling, and concluding in the affected, wordy style that a schoolboy might use to a fancied, incorporeal sweetheart.
For, the people who were shovelling away on the housetops were jovial and full of glee; calling out to one another from the parapets, and now and then exchanging a facetious snowball -- better-natured missile far than many a wordy jest -- laughing heartily if it went right and not less heartily if it went wrong.
If thou carriest the prize, I will add to it twenty nobles; but if thou losest it, thou shalt be stript of thy Lincoln green, and scourged out of the lists with bowstrings, for a wordy and insolent braggart.
Mordaunt, completely deceived by the wordy civility of D'Artagnan, smiled like a man who understands perfectly the reasons given him, and said:
The men however, are not quite so harmonious in their utterance, and when excited upon any subject, would work themselves up into a sort of wordy paroxysm, during which all descriptions of rough-sided sounds were projected from their mouths, with a force and rapidity which was absolutely astonishing.
It was quite a wordy sarmon that Parson Grant gave us to-night,” said Remarkable.
These wordy contests, though violent, were brief; "and within fifteen minutes," says the captain, "they would be caressing each other like children.
The long wordy discussions by which he tries to reason us into admiration of his poetry, speak very little in his favor: they are full of such assertions as this (I have opened one of his volumes at random) -"Of genius the only proof is the act of doing well what is worthy to be done, and what was never done before;'-indeed?