wore


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Related to wore: wore out

wore

 (wôr)
v.
Past tense of wear.

wore

(wɔː)
vb
the past tense of wear1

wear

(wɛər)

v. wore, worn, wear•ing,
n. v.t.
1. to carry or have on the body or about the person as a covering, support, ornament, or the like: to wear a coat; to wear a wig.
2. to bear or have in one's aspect or appearance: to wear a smile.
3. to cause to deteriorate, diminish, or waste by some constant or repetitive action: The waves have worn these rocks.
4. to make (a hole, channel, way, etc.) by such action.
5. to consume gradually by use or any continued process: Illness had worn the bloom from her cheeks.
6. to weary; fatigue; exhaust.
7. to pass (time) gradually or tediously (usu. fol. by away or out).
8. Naut. to bring (a vessel) on another tack by turning until the wind is on the stern.
v.i.
9. to undergo gradual impairment, diminution, reduction, etc., from use, attrition, or other causes.
10. to retain shape, color, firmness, etc., under continued use or strain: a strong fabric that will wear.
11. (of time) to pass, esp. slowly or tediously (often fol. by on or away): As the day wore on, we grew more discouraged.
12. wear down,
a. to make or become shabbier, smaller, or more aged by wearing: to wear down the heels of one's shoes.
b. to make or become weary; tire.
c. to prevail upon or over by persistence; overcome: to wear down the opposition.
13. wear off, to diminish slowly or gradually or to diminish in effect; disappear: The drug began to wear off.
14. wear out,
a. to make or become unfit or useless through hard or extended use: to wear out clothes.
b. to expend, consume, or remove, esp. slowly or gradually.
c. to exhaust, as by continued strain; weary.
n.
15. the act of wearing; use, as of a garment: articles for winter wear.
16. the state of being worn, as on the person.
17. clothing or other articles for wearing, esp. for a particular function, fashion, or type of person (often used in combination): sleepwear; sportswear.
18. gradual impairment, wasting, diminution, etc., as from use.
19. the quality of resisting deterioration with use; durability.
Idioms:
wear thin,
a. to diminish; weaken: My patience is wearing thin.
b. to become less appealing, interesting, tolerable, etc.
[before 900; Middle English weren to have (clothes) on, waste, damage, Old English werian, c. Old Saxon werian, Old High German werien, Old Norse verja, Gothic wasjan to clothe; akin to Latin vestis clothing (see vest)]
wear′er, n.
Translations

wore

pret de wear
References in classic literature ?
Laurie didn't seem to know where to begin, but Jo's eager questions soon set him going, and he told her how he had been at school in Vevay, where the boys never wore hats and had a fleet of boats on the lake, and for holiday fun went on walking trips about Switzerland with their teachers.
In the office he wore also a linen duster with huge pockets into which he continually stuffed scraps of paper.
All right, then I'll cut along," Tom said, and he wore a relieved air.
He wore the rings and pins and badges of different fraternal orders to which he belonged.
at least I thought so; but I knew my mother always wore one when she went out, and all horses did when they were grown up; and so, what with the nice oats, and what with my master's pats, kind words, and gentle ways, I got to wear my bit and bridle.
Around her head she wore a hoop of flame-red poppies.
We had often noticed that many of the students wore a colored silk band or ribbon diagonally across their breasts.
Now, as for this pretty doll, my little Alice," said Grandfather, "I wish you could have seen what splendid dresses the ladies wore in those times.
She was dressed now just as she was to be in the evening, with a tucker made of "real" lace, which her aunt had lent her for this unparalleled occasion, but with no ornaments besides; she had even taken out her small round ear-rings which she wore every day.
In summer time the men went entirely naked; in the winter and in bad weather the men wore a small robe, reaching to the middle of the thigh, made of the skins of animals, or of the wool of the mountain sheep.
They wore the cast-off graces of the gentry; - and this, I believe, involves the best definition of the class.
On the feet were some old boots with blue tops, such as every man wore in this country, and the figure was raised above the stalks of corn by means of the pole stuck up its back.