work hardening


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Related to work hardening: Precipitation hardening

work hardening

n.
The increase in strength that accompanies plastic deformation of a metal.
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All parties involved should invest more in conservative care, which includes multidisciplinary/inter-disciplinary functional restoration programs, work hardening programs and cognitive behavioral therapy and coaching.
AHSS also have good bake hardening ability (BH effect) and work hardening ability (WH effect)--Fig.
In the last 12 months, PROHMS has increased its portfolio for well-being by opening the PROHMS Health Academy which looks at personal fitness and work hardening programmes relevant to all industries and individuals.
Among specific topics are high-pressure torsion for ring samples in different thicknesses, fabricating nanocrystalline copper by explosive dynamic loading, disorientations after severe plastic deformation and their effect on work hardening, microstructure evolution of pure nickel up to a high strain level during equal-channel angular pressing, producing bulk ultrafine grained steel through severe plastic deformation, cooperative grain boundary sliding and shear banding at high strains in ultrafine grained and nanocrystalline lead alloys, the distribution of mechanical properties by volume in titanium billets processed by twist extrusion, and the effects of high pressure torsion on magnetic properties of amorphous alloys.
Due to the work hardening effect caused by the cutting forces it became evident that a diametrical behaviour is present.
According to Kim and Yang [19], the FE formulation for rigid-plastic deformation in a material subject to work hardening has the form
The work material flow stress is depicted as a product of strain, strain rate and temperature effects which induce work hardening, strain rate hardening and thermal softening respectively.
The microhardness of the as-sprayed Ti coating was slightly higher compared to pure Ti bulk, owing to the work hardening effect during deposition.
In addition, it will identify hard spots due to chemical changes, hydrogen enbrittlement and work hardening.
The latter two assumptions imply that work hardening in the material should not be significant enough to generate stable necking.
Most commonly seen when rough machining work hardening materials such as stainless steels and high-temp alloys.
Work hardening is another and, related, the impulses traveling through a spring exist well beyond the expected back-and-forth compression and rebound stresses.