workerist


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workerist

(ˈwɜːkərɪst)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a supporter of working-class politics
adj
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) of or relating to a view of politics that emphasizes the importance of the working class
References in periodicals archive ?
Historically, many early Ultras groups in Italy, particularly in Bologna, Turin, and Livorno, were connected to workerist movements, often using the stadium to express solidarity with struggling workers (Doidge, 2013; Sommerey, 2012).
On the other hand, by criticising the anarchist-trade unionist positions and reiterating the role of the state in the transition process, it seems to foreshadow the polemics with those workerist currents which also had some influence within the PCI, and which were about to come to the fore in Italy in the shape of the Quaderni Rossi group and others.
BALTIC, Gateshead South Shore Road (0191 478 1810) Amanda Beech's Covenant Transport Move Or Die 2016: The artist's five channel video installation features five characters who form a workerist crew.
OE: The Venice Biennale is an institution that has gone through World War I, World War II, fascism in Italy, and the workerist and Autonomia movements of the 1960s and '70s.
The traditional workerist focus has been challenged by pauperist reforms, without an agrarian focus, as plans for land reform have been stagnating since the beginning of the 1990s (Fernandes 2010).
I remember when I was working in Oxford we were quite workerist, and we felt the women's movement was crucial but that conscious raising groups were not enough.
These workerist movements were autonomous, unaffiliated with any of the political parties.
With the suppression of groups such as Potere operaio, Virno and other thinkers of the workerist movement reconsidered the relationship between political intervention of the multitudes and language.
In terms of his self-interest, then, Jughashvili had a powerful motive to adapt to the prevailing workerist atmosphere of Georgian social democracy.
The article focuses especially on Tronti's so-called 'Copernican revolution'--giving workers' struggles primacy in the understanding of capitalism--and critically inquires into the effect of this workerist axiom on Negri's writings on proletarian sabotage and insurrection in the 1970s.
Workers were more than simply the sum of their jobs and workplaces; for Marx, workerist identity was a distorting effect of capitalism, something to be transcended not reified.