workhouse


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work·house

 (wûrk′hous′)
n.
1. A prison in which limited sentences are served at manual labor.
2. Chiefly British A poorhouse.

workhouse

(ˈwɜːkˌhaʊs)
n
1. (Law) (formerly in England) an institution maintained at public expense where able-bodied paupers did unpaid work in return for food and accommodation
2. (Law) (in the US) a prison for petty offenders serving short sentences at manual labour

work•house

(ˈwɜrkˌhaʊs)

n., pl. -hous•es (-ˌhaʊ zɪz)
1. a house of correction in which the prisoners are required to work.
2. Brit. a poorhouse.
[1645–55]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.workhouse - a poorhouse where able-bodied poor are compelled to labor
poorhouse - an establishment maintained at public expense in order to provide housing for the poor and homeless
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
2.workhouse - a county jail that holds prisoners for periods up to 18 months
gaol, jail, jailhouse, pokey, poky, slammer, clink - a correctional institution used to detain persons who are in the lawful custody of the government (either accused persons awaiting trial or convicted persons serving a sentence)
Translations

workhouse

[ˈwɜːkhaʊs] N (workhouses (pl)) [ˈwɜːkhaʊzɪz] (Brit) (Hist) → asilo m de pobres

workhouse

[ˈwɜːkˌhaʊs] n (Brit) (History) → ospizio (in cui i ricoverati lavoravano)
References in classic literature ?
That's yonder,--the great brick house, you know,--the workhouse, most folks call it; but I mean to do my work first, and go there to be idle and enjoy myself.
I was a farmer's boy, not earning enough to keep myself, much less both of us, and she must have gone to the workhouse but for our mistress
There was the hospital to take her to; and if the hospital shut its doors, there was the workhouse to try next.
Luke's workhouse, in the neighbourhood, completed the establishment.
They must fetch her away to the workhouse to-morrow.
And also how I, who never did a stroke of work in my life, am overburdened with wealth; whilst the children of the men who made that wealth are slaving as their fathers slaved, or starving, or in the workhouse, or on the streets, or the deuce knows where.
During his walk of a few yards he had had time and calmness enough to widen his view of consequences, and he saw that to get Jacob taken to the workhouse or to the lock-up house as an offensive stranger might have awkward effects if his family took the trouble of inquiring after him.
But presently Dent brings up a poor fellow who has killed a hare, and when I've got through my 'justicing,' as Carroll calls it, I'm inclined for a ride round the glebe, and on my way back I meet with the master of the workhouse, who has got a long story of a mutinous pauper to tell me; and so the day goes on, and I'm always the same lazy fellow before evening sets in.
It is, however, the possession, and the only possession except fifty shillings per annum and a very small box indifferently filled with clothing, of a lean young woman from a workhouse (by some supposed to have been christened Augusta) who, although she was farmed or contracted for during her growing time by an amiable benefactor of his species resident at Tooting, and cannot fail to have been developed under the most favourable circumstances, "has fits," which the parish can't account for.
An artist would let his mother go to the workhouse.
What is there for me if I chuck it but the workhouse in my old age?
The workhouse first, perhaps--and then the madhouse.