working day


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Related to working day: workday, Business Day

working day

n.
A workday.

working day

or

workday

n
1. (Industrial Relations & HR Terms) a day on which work is done, esp for an agreed or stipulated number of hours in return for a salary or wage
2. (Industrial Relations & HR Terms) the part of the day allocated to work: a seven-hour working day.
3. (Commerce) (often plural) commerce any day of the week except Sunday, public holidays, and, in some cases, Saturday

work•day

(ˈwɜrkˌdeɪ)

n.
1. a day on which work is done; working day.
2. the part of a day during which one works.
3. the length of time during a day on which one works: a seven-hour workday.
adj.
[1400–50]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.working day - a day on which work is doneworking day - a day on which work is done    
weekday - any day except Sunday (and sometimes except Saturday)
2.working day - the amount of time that a worker must work for an agreed daily wageworking day - the amount of time that a worker must work for an agreed daily wage; "they work an 8-hour day"
day - the recurring hours when you are not sleeping (especially those when you are working); "my day began early this morning"; "it was a busy day on the stock exchange"; "she called it a day and went to bed"
man hour, person hour - a time unit used in industry for measuring work
duty period, work shift, shift - the time period during which you are at work
Translations
arbejdsdag
munkanap
vinnudagurvirkur dagur, vinnudagur
çalışma günügünlük çalışma süresi

work

(wəːk) noun
1. effort made in order to achieve or make something. He has done a lot of work on this project
2. employment. I cannot find work in this town.
3. a task or tasks; the thing that one is working on. Please clear your work off the table.
4. a painting, book, piece of music etc. the works of Van Gogh / Shakespeare/Mozart; This work was composed in 1816.
5. the product or result of a person's labours. His work has shown a great improvement lately.
6. one's place of employment. He left (his) work at 5.30 p.m.; I don't think I'll go to work tomorrow.
verb
1. to (cause to) make efforts in order to achieve or make something. She works at the factory three days a week; He works his employees very hard; I've been working on/at a new project.
2. to be employed. Are you working just now?
3. to (cause to) operate (in the correct way). He has no idea how that machine works / how to work that machine; That machine doesn't/won't work, but this one's working.
4. to be practicable and/or successful. If my scheme works, we'll be rich!
5. to make (one's way) slowly and carefully with effort or difficulty. She worked her way up the rock face.
6. to get into, or put into, a stated condition or position, slowly and gradually. The wheel worked loose.
7. to make by craftsmanship. The ornaments had been worked in gold.
-work
1. (the art of making) goods of a particular material. He learns woodwork at school; This shop sells basketwork.
2. parts of something, eg a building, made of a particular material. The stonework/woodwork/paintwork needs to be renewed.
ˈworkable adjective
(of a plan) able to be carried out.
ˈworker noun
1. a person who works or who is employed in an office, a factory etc. office-workers; car-workers.
2. a manual worker rather than an office-worker etc.
3. a person who works (hard etc). He's a slow/hard worker.
works noun singular or plural
a factory etc. The steelworks is/are closed for the holidays.
noun plural
1. the mechanism (of a watch, clock etc). The works are all rusted.
2. deeds, actions etc. She's devoted her life to good works.
ˈwork-basket, ˈwork-box
etc nouns a basket, box etc for holding thread, needlework etc.
ˈworkbook noun
a book of exercises usually with spaces for answers.
ˈworkforce noun
the number of workers (available for work) in a particular industry, factory etc.
working class
the section of society who work with their hands, doing manual labour.
working day, ˈwork-day nouns
1. a day on which one goes to work, and is not on holiday.
2. the period of actual labour in a normal day at work. My working day is eight hours long.
working hours
the times of day between which one is at work. Normal working hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
ˈworking-party, ˈwork-party nouns
a group of people gathered together (usually voluntarily) to perform a particular physical task. They organized a work-party to clear the canal of weeds.
working week
the five days from Monday to Friday inclusive when people go to work.
ˈworkman noun
a man who does manual work. the workmen on a building site.
ˈworkmanlike adjective
1. suitable to a good workman. a workmanlike attitude.
2. well performed. a workmanlike job.
ˈworkmanship noun
the skill of a qualified workman; skill in making things.
ˈworkmate noun
one of the people who work in the same place of employment as oneself. Her workmates teased her about being the boss's favourite.
ˈworkout noun
a period of hard physical exercise for the purpose of keeping fit etc.
ˈworkshop noun
1. a room or building, especially in a factory etc where construction and repairs are carried out.
2. a course of experimental work for a group of people on a particular project.
at work
working. He's writing a novel and he likes to be at work (on it) by eight o'clock every morning.
get/set to work
to start work. Could you get to work painting that ceiling?; I'll have to set to work on this mending this evening.
go to work on
to begin work on. We're thinking of going to work on an extension to the house.
have one's work cut out
to be faced with a difficult task. You'll have your work cut out to beat the champion.
in working order
(of a machine etc) operating correctly.
out of work
having no employment. He's been out of work for months.
work of art
a painting, sculpture etc.
work off
to get rid of (something unwanted or unpleasant) by taking physical exercise etc. He worked off his anger by running round the garden six times.
work out
1. to solve or calculate correctly. I can't work out how many should be left.
2. to come to a satisfactory end. Don't worry – it will all work out (in the end).
3. to perform physical exercises.
work up
1. to excite or rouse gradually. She worked herself up into a fury. (adjective ˌworked-ˈup: Don't get so worked-up!).
2. to raise or create. I just can't work up any energy/appetite/enthusiasm today.
work up to
to progress towards and prepare for. Work up to the difficult exercises gradually.
work wonders
to produce marvellous results. These pills have worked wonders on my rheumatism.
References in classic literature ?
The roar of the working day drowns the voices of the elfin sprites that are ever singing their low-toned
In its light our cares of the working day grow small and trivial, and bread and cheese--ay, and even kisses--do not seem the only things worth striving for.
The company doctor bandaged it up, but he got no other thanks from any one, and was laid up for eight working days without any pay.
On working days she would go to see him at work either at the workshops or at the brick kilns, or at the sheds on the banks of the Irtish.
Our friend Doctor Allday was right, when he said that my working days were over.
The target is for 93% of mail to arrive the next working day.
No Graham Ewart managing director of Direct Healthcare Services AS a key supplier to the NHS in the UK, and a global business, a sixhour working day would not allow us to be aligned to our customers' needs.
Due to coincidence of weekends and holidays, the day-off is postponed to the next working day after the holiday," the statement said.
If you are aged 18 or over, and your working day is more than six hours, you have the right to an uninterrupted rest break of at least 20 minutes.
BEIRUT: Prime Minister Tammam Salam Tuesday issued a memo shortening the working day for government employees during the holy month of Ramadan, set to begin in late June.
4% of first class mail the next working day against a target of 93%, while 99% of second class post was delivered within three working days, against a target of 98.
Attacks on police officers and staff have resulted in more than 3000 working days being lost in the last three years, according to new figures.