workingman


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal.

work·ing·man

 (wûr′kĭng-măn′)
n.
1. A man who works for wages.
2. A man who performs heavy manual or industrial labor.

workingman

(ˈwɜːkɪŋˌmæn)
n, pl -men
a man who performs manual labour

work•ing•man

(ˈwɜr kɪŋˌmæn)

n., pl. -men.
a man of the working class; a man, whether skilled or unskilled, who earns his living at some manual or industrial work.
[1630–40]
usage: See -man.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.workingman - an employee who performs manual or industrial laborworkingman - an employee who performs manual or industrial labor
excavator - a workman who excavates for foundations of buildings or for quarrying
blaster, chargeman - a workman employed to blast with explosives
employee - a worker who is hired to perform a job
fuller - a workman who fulls (cleans and thickens) freshly woven cloth for a living
gas fitter - a workman who installs and repairs gas fixtures and appliances
guest worker, guestworker - a person with temporary permission to work in another country; "a Moroccan guestworker in Canada was accused of aiding terrorists"
heaver - a workman who heaves freight or bulk goods (especially at a dockyard)
laborer, labourer, manual laborer, jack - someone who works with their hands; someone engaged in manual labor
lacer - a workman who laces shoes or footballs or books (during binding)
lather - a workman who puts up laths
Luddite - one of the 19th century English workmen who destroyed laborsaving machinery that they thought would cause unemployment
factory worker, mill-hand - a workman in a mill or factory
mover - workman employed by a moving company; "the movers were very careful with the grand piano"
bagger, packer, boxer - a workman employed to pack things into containers
paster - a workman who pastes
disinfestation officer, rat-catcher - a workman employed to destroy or drive away vermin
road mender, roadman - a workman who is employed to repair roads
roundsman - a workman employed to make rounds (to deliver goods or make inspections or so on)
scratcher - a workman who uses a tool for scratching
shearer - a workman who uses shears to cut leather or metal or textiles
sponger - a workman employed to collect sponges
stamper - a workman whose job is to form or cut out by applying a mold or die (either by hand or by operating a stamping machine)
utility man - a workman expected to serve in any capacity when called on
warehouseman, warehouser - a workman who manages or works in a warehouse
wetter - a workman who wets the work in a manufacturing process

workingman

noun
References in classic literature ?
But to return to the earth, the workingman, being selfish, wants all he can get in the division.
One of these papers was as good as a circus, and nearly as good as a spree--certainly a most wonderful treat for a workingman, who was tired out and stupefied, and had never had any education, and whose work was one dull, sordid grind, day after day, and year after year, with never a sight of a green field nor an hour's entertainment, nor anything but liquor to stimulate his imagination.
He should pay folks off properly," a thin workingman, with frowning brows and a straggly beard, was saying.
An hour ago, on East Thirty-ninth Street, a workingman was thrust through the heart with a knife.
Parler d'un film, cela peut consister a tenter de le decrire et de s'appuyer sur la difficulte meme de cette entreprise, puisqu'il est impossible de la mener de facon exhaustive, mais on peut chercher a en restituer le souffle, a identifier les emotions qu'il a suscitees, dans leur lien aux operations, aux touches sensibles memorables --ce qui pour Workingman 's Death a ete tente dans le numero precedent (1).
He was a church-going teetotaler, favored obscure Victorian-era folk dances and believed in the natural superiority of farms to cities--even in his workingman days, Ford managed to keep a country home.
McKinley, the unassuming Methodist/Mason from Ohio, was popular and, in many ways, a model president who championed the cause of the workingman, united the country, and led it into the 20th century as a world power.
He painted what he knew to be the life of a child, a student, a soldier, or a workingman, whether in the Mamaroneck, New York, of his youth, or anywhere else he lived after that.