workpeople

work·peo·ple

 (wûrk′pē′pəl)
pl.n. Chiefly British
Those who work for wages; workers.

workpeople

(ˈwɜːkˌpiːpəl)
pl n
(Sociology) the working members of a population, esp those employed in manual tasks

work•peo•ple

(ˈwɜrkˌpi pəl)

n.pl.
people employed at work or labor; workers; employees.
[1700–10]
Translations

workpeople

[ˈwɜːkˌpiːpl] N (= workers) → obreros mpl; (= staff) → personal m, mano f de obra
References in classic literature ?
Keeping ever close by the work of excavation, he busied himself incessantly with the welfare and health of his workpeople, and was singularly fortunate in warding off the epidemics common to large communities of men, and so disastrous in those regions of the globe which are exposed to the influences of tropical climates.
The workpeople, to be sure--riggers and what not--were most annoyingly slow; but time cured that.
Workpeople were passing to and fro; a waggon was being laden with pieces.
When a fire glowed, banks of smoke, blown level along the ground, would themselves become illuminated to an opaque lustre, screening the workpeople from one another; and meaning of the "pillar of a cloud", which was a wall by day and a light by night, could be understood.
While the workpeople are in the house, my duty as a servant gets the better of my feelings as a man.
Peter was a just master, and paid his workpeople every evening.
Out of some she had been ordered with curses; but Marija was not afraid of man or devil, and asked every one she saw--visitors and strangers, or workpeople like herself, and once or twice even high and lofty office personages, who stared at her as if they thought she was crazy.
At first the contest is carried on by individual labourers, then by the workpeople of a factory, then by the operatives of one trade, in one locality, against the individual bourgeois who directly exploits them.
The proper estimates were to be submitted to him as soon as possible, and it would greatly facilitate his entering into definite arrangements with the workpeople, if he could be informed of the exact period at which the wedding ceremony might be expected to take place.
Yes, sir, we have several among our workpeople and cleaners.
If this lot can find time to champion workpeople while dragging the UK out of the EU, then I will stand the drop of York.
Citing the second part of More's story Tom White, in which Tom, now a successful farmer, holds a traditional sheep-shearing feast for his neighbors, workpeople, and the old and infirm poor of the community, Plumptre complains that it is unrealistic to expect that such a feast might be celebrated by singing psalms: