worldliness


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world·ly

 (wûrld′lē)
adj. world·li·er, world·li·est
1. Of, relating to, or devoted to the material world, especially in contrast to spiritual concerns.
2. Experienced in human affairs; sophisticated or worldly-wise: "an experienced and worldly man who had been almost everywhere" (Willa Cather).
adv.
In a worldly manner.

world′li·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.worldliness - the quality or character of being intellectually sophisticated and worldly through cultivation or experience or disillusionment
quality - an essential and distinguishing attribute of something or someone; "the quality of mercy is not strained"--Shakespeare
2.worldliness - concern with worldly affairs to the neglect of spiritual needs; "he disliked the worldliness of many bishops around him"
externality, outwardness - the quality or state of being outside or directed toward or relating to the outside or exterior; "the outwardness of the world"
otherworldliness, spiritism, spirituality, spiritualism - concern with things of the spirit
Translations
حُب الدُّنْيَوِيّات
verdslighed
evilági jellegvilágiasság
veraldlegt hugarfar
svetskosť
dünyevîlikmaddecilik

worldliness

[ˈwɜːldlɪnɪs] Nmundanería f; (= sophistication) → sofisticación f

worldliness

nWeltlichkeit f; (of person)weltliche Gesinnung

world

(wəːld) noun
1. the planet Earth. every country of the world.
2. the people who live on the planet Earth. The whole world is waiting for a cure for cancer.
3. any planet etc. people from other worlds.
4. a state of existence. Many people believe that after death the soul enters the next world; Do concentrate! You seem to be living in another world.
5. an area of life or activity. the insect world; the world of the international businessman.
6. a great deal. The holiday did him a/the world of good.
7. the lives and ways of ordinary people. He's been a monk for so long that he knows nothing of the (outside) world.
ˈworldly adjective
of or belonging to this world; not spiritual. worldly pleasures.
ˈworldliness noun
ˌworldˈwide adjective, adverb
(extending over or found) everywhere in the world. a worldwide sales network; Their products are sold worldwide.
World Wide WebWWWthe best of both worlds
the advantages of both the alternatives in a situation etc in which one can normally only expect to have one. A woman has the best of both worlds when she has a good job and a happy family life.
for all the world
exactly, quite etc. What a mess you're in! You look for all the world as if you'd had an argument with an express train.
out of this world
unbelievably marvellous. The concert was out of this world.
what in the world(?)
used for emphasis when asking a question. What in the world have you done to your hair?
References in classic literature ?
He saw no more the deep eyes, but the voice came over him as a spirit voice, and, as in a sort of judgment vision, his whole past life rose in a moment before his eyes: his mother's prayers and hymns; his own early yearnings and aspirings for good; and, between them and this hour, years of worldliness and scepticism, and what man calls respectable living.
He had, in his serious moments, striven to make her sensible of the baseness he saw in her worldliness, flattering her by his apparent conviction--which she shared--that she was capable of a higher life.
The stern lesson of the day had done its work; her worldliness was gone.
I saw into her pitiless soul--saw its barren worldliness, its scorching hate--and felt it clothe me round like an air I was obliged to breathe.
Skimpole's worldliness in his having his expenses paid by Richard, but I made no remark about that.
3) to withdraw from worldliness, but not avoid (a) the service of the state, (b) family duties, (c) relations with my friends, and the management of my affairs.
I don't wish to act otherwise than as your best friend, Vincy, when I say that what you have been uttering just now is one mass of worldliness and inconsistent folly.
The only difference I see is that one worldliness is a little bit honester than another.
No foible is too trifling for Chaucer's quiet observation; while if he does not choose to denounce the hypocrisy of the Pardoner and the worldliness of the Monk, he has made their weaknesses sources of amusement (and indeed object-lessons as well) for all the coming generations.
And then she mentioned how often she had heard of Lady Southdown from that excellent man the Reverend Lawrence Grills, Minister of the chapel in May Fair, which she frequented; and how her views were very much changed by circumstances and misfortunes; and how she hoped that a past life spent in worldliness and error might not incapacitate her from more serious thought for the future.
Their gentle influence may teach us how to weave fresh garlands for the graves of those we loved: may purify our thoughts, and bear down before it old enmity and hatred; but beneath all this, there lingers, in the least reflective mind, a vague and half-formed consciousness of having held such feelings long before, in some remote and distant time, which calls up solemn thoughts of distant times to come, and bends down pride and worldliness beneath it.
Here one has conventional worldly notions and habits without instruction and without polish, surely the most prosaic form of human life; proud respectability in a gig of unfashionable build; worldliness without side-dishes.