worldly belongings


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ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.worldly belongings - all the property that someone possess; "he left all his worldly possessions to his daughter"
belongings, property, holding - something owned; any tangible or intangible possession that is owned by someone; "that hat is my property"; "he is a man of property";
References in periodicals archive ?
Ben Smith was planning to move to his family's new home in Hipperholme at the weekend when one of the three vans carrying all their worldly belongings was stolen as workmen loaded the other.
As I watched I was thinking "he leaves nothing behind, he is going to nothing and his whole worldly belongings are in that bag".
I packed up my old Ford Fiesta with all my worldly belongings and headed for the Big Smoke, sleeping on floors, then in bedsits until I had earned enough to rent my first flat.
I packed up my old Ford Fiesta with all my worldly belongings and headed for city life, sleeping on floors and then in bedsits until I had earned enough to rent my first flat.
GRIEVING mum Natalia Spencer strides along the craggy coastline with all her worldly belongings tucked into a neat pink rucksack.
It is through her that my unused and imprisoned worldly belongings find a voice to air their silent cry for liberation.
Liz and Molly unwittingly sell Alasdair's worldly belongings at the charity shop, which forces him to tell them the truth about his living arrangements.
With her daughters and worldly belongings in the car, no job to go to and no money in the bank, she drove to Nelson to start a fresh life.
Each has their worldly belongings tied up in plastic shopping bags from a grocery store that might sit at any corner in any street in any city around the world.
For Williams, it included all of her worldly belongings, from her bedroom suite (a mattress and a quilt) to her home entertainment equipment (a laptop) to her jewelry collection (four pieces in all: two necklaces and two pairs of earrings).
In his poignant reflections about Haj, he writes, "As millions of Muslims circuit the Kaaba, it is impossible to differentiate the rich from the poor, the educated from the illiterate, the prince from the pauper -- each one of them is wearing the same type of cloth, each has shed their worldly belongings in submission to their Lord.